Elkhart County Symphony "Tricks & Treats" October 21st at The Lerner

WVPE invites you to the Elkhart County Symphony Concert Tricks & Treats , Sunday, October 21 st at 4 pm at The Lerner Theatre in downtown Elkhart. Tricks & Treats features classical selections fitting for the season including Gounod, Bach, Holst, Berlioz and more, conducted by Brian Groner. Costumes are encouraged and there will also be an instrument petting zoo for all ages to try. Doors open at 3, and a photo booth will also be available for fun photos. Click here to order tickets.

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Nuns On A Bus Tour Stops In South Bend

The Nuns on a Bus tour made a stop in South Bend this afternoon. They’re a group of Catholic sisters that travel the country holding rallies about social justice issues. This tour the nuns are focusing on income inequality and the recent tax law changes. Sister Mary Ellen Lacy is one of the nuns. “As Catholic Sisters it’s offensive to us when we see legislation that creates an economy of exclusion or inequality because as our Pope tells us such an economy kills and it violates our sacred vow...

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Imagine if President Trump, on the weekend after the upcoming midterm elections, suddenly forced out Jeff Sessions, Rod Rosenstein and Robert Mueller.

For the record, that would be the removal of the attorney general, the deputy attorney general and the special counsel investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election.

And imagine Trump also shut down the offices occupied by Mueller's team of prosecutors — lock, stock and barrel.

Just like that.

Impossible, you say? Unprecedented? In fact, it is neither.

What can an old piece of cloth tell us about the rise and fall of a kingdom? Quite a lot, if you know how to read it.

I once listened to an interview with Spanish singer-songwriter Joaquín Sabina in which he said a good song is the sum of good lyrics, good music, and something else no one can describe. That definition works, but only if you never identify the last thing. In Jeff Jackson's Destroy All Monsters, performance is the third component, and focusing on that mystic element kills music's significance and magic.

Jason Logan is constantly looking at the ground.

"What I like to do is just walk really slowly," he says, eyes down. He's in a dusty, chain-link fence-lined alley in downtown Washington, D.C., with broken bottles and chunks of concrete scattered about. It's right off one of the city's major streets, and the buzz of traffic and wail of sirens fill the air.

"Part of what I do and part of what I'm excited by is just opening up people's eyes to what's going on at their feet," Logan says, scanning. "Kind of through the lens of: Could I make an ink out of that?"

This week in the Russia investigations: Why aren't the Democrats trying harder to exploit the Mueller investigation? And Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein set to stop by for a little visit to Congress.

The health care election

The president's onetime national security adviser, campaign chairman, campaign vice chairman, campaign foreign policy aide and others have pleaded guilty to federal charges.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has all but abandoned its use of federal prisons to house detainees.

In early June, the agency announced it was sending up to 1,600 immigrant detainees to five federal prisons in Texas, Oregon, California, Washington, and Arizona.

But now, a total of only three ICE detainees remain across the five prisons that once held hundreds of immigrants. Immigrant detainees left the federal prisons either because they were deported, transferred to civil detention facilities, or were granted bail

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

Harvard's admissions practices go on trial

The highly anticipated trial about Harvard University's admissions practices began Monday and continued through the week. Students for Fair Admissions, a group that opposes affirmative action, sued Harvard in 2014, alleging that the school discriminates against Asian-American applicants by rating them lower on personality measures that factor into admissions.

Swimming in St. Andrew Bay was the first thing Jillian Arrowood wanted to do when she moved into her new home on Tyndall Air Force base on October 8. She and her two daughters had just joined her husband William, her son, and her father-in-law, an Army retiree who had recently had a stroke, in their new home by the water.

Her 12-year old daughter didn't have a bathing suit, but was so excited that she jumped in the water with her clothes on. It felt like a perfect day: 85 degrees, sunny, and slightly breezy. There was no indication of the bad weather that was headed their way.

The European Union's highest court on Friday ordered Poland to reverse a law leading to the removal of nearly a third of the nation's Supreme Court judges, and to reinstate those who were dismissed.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Now let's bring in NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith to talk about how the president might respond to tonight's developments. Hey there, Tam.

TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Hi.

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The Democracy Test from Truth, Politics and Power

Mondays at 9 PM, October 8, 15, 22, 29 and November 12 and 19 The presidency of Donald Trump has sparked a national conversation in America. Is our democracy at risk? “The Democracy Test” will give a broad and diverse national platform to this work. Over the course of six episodes, we’ll examine the fault lines of American democracy. Our guests will bring the kind of expertise needed to understand what is truly unique in this moment of our nation’s history, what brought us here, and what it...

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