Tracking The Ozone Hole, As It Waxes And Wanes

October 12, 2012

Every August, the ozone hole begins to grow over Antarctica, reaching its maximum size by late September. But by the New Year, it's gone again. Russell Schnell, of NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory, explains the weird forces behind the ozone hole's formation--and why, in recent years, an ozone hole has capped the Arctic too.

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