James Doubek

Doubek started at NPR as a part-time production assistant in 2015 before joining full time as an associate producer in 2017. He previously was an intern at NPR's Washington Desk in the summer of 2015.

Australia's Liberal Party was in flux Wednesday as opponents of Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull pushed for new party leadership.

Turnbull remained in his job after Liberal Party members in Parliament backed him in a 48 to 35 vote Tuesday, though he could soon face a fresh challenge.

"The iron laws of arithmetic confirmed my leadership," Turnbull told reporters Wednesday. However, the numbers were an "unconvincing victory," as Reuters described it, leaving Turnbull "vulnerable to another challenge."

Updated at 12:35 p.m. ET

Hurricane Lane has been downgraded to a Category 4 storm as it moves closer to Hawaii, the National Weather Service said Wednesday.

The NWS says a hurricane warning is in effect for Maui and Hawaii, which is also known as the Big Island, while the islands of Kauai and Oahu, where Honolulu is located, are under a hurricane watch.

Eight restaurant chains have agreed to drop the use of agreements that prevent their workers from finding higher-paying jobs at other locations of the same chain, Washington state's attorney general said this week.

Applebee's, Church's Chicken, Five Guys, IHOP, Jamba Juice, Little Caesars, Panera and Sonic agreed to end the "no-poach" agreements immediately at all of their locations nationwide and to stop using the language in future franchise contracts, in order to avoid lawsuits over the practice, according to the office of Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson.

An elite boarding school in Connecticut is acknowledging sexual abuse by seven now-former staffers against 16 students — going back as far as 1969 and lasting until 1992.

The Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Conn., is a private high school of about 600 students.

Updated at 8:36 a.m. ET

Former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan died Saturday, the foundation bearing his name confirmed. He was 80.

"Kofi Annan was a global statesman and a deeply committed internationalist who fought throughout his life for a fairer and more peaceful world. During his distinguished career and leadership of the United Nations, he was an ardent champion of peace, sustainable development, human rights and the rule of law," the Kofi Annan Foundation and Annan family said in a statement.

The World Health Organization said Friday that security concerns in the Democratic Republic of the Congo's North Kivu region were preventing aid workers from reaching certain areas — and leaving open the possibility of the Ebola virus spreading.

At least 1,500 people could be exposed to the virus, WHO spokesperson Tarik Jasarevic told reporters in Geneva, according to Reuters.

Former Trump White House staffer Omarosa Manigault Newman released excerpts of a recording on Thursday that she said corroborated her claim of being offered a job paying $15,000 a month in exchange for staying quiet about her time in the administration.

Excerpts of a secret phone recording between Manigault Newman and President Trump's daughter-in-law Lara Trump aired on MSNBC on Thursday.

In a move it said was to address the large cost of entering a career in medicine, New York University's School of Medicine said Thursday that it will offer full scholarships to all current and future students in its doctor of medicine program.

NYU said it was the "only top 10-ranked" medical school in the U.S. to offer such a generous package.

Two women accused of killing Kim Jong Nam, the estranged half brother of North Korea's dictator, will remain in custody after a judge in Malaysia on Thursday said there is enough evidence of a "well-planned conspiracy" to move the case forward.

The Colorado baker who won a Supreme Court case over his refusal to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple is suing state officials, alleging religious discrimination over his refusal to make a cake celebrating a gender transition.

Attorneys for Jack Phillips, who owns Masterpiece Cakeshop in Lakewood, Colo., said Wednesday that the state is "continuing to single out Jack for punishment and to exhibit hostility toward his religious beliefs."

Updated at 10:04 a.m. ET

More than 300 news publications across the country are joining together to defend the role of a free press and denounce President Trump's ongoing attacks on the news media in coordinated editorials publishing Thursday, according to a tally by The Boston Globe.

Updated at 8:56 a.m. ET Sunday

Results from primary elections in Hawaii show Democratic Gov. David Ige likely holding onto his job after a challenge from Rep. Colleen Hanabusa, who currently represents Hawaii's 1st Congressional District.

In other high-profile contests, former congressman Ed Case appeared to be headed back to Washington to represent Hawaii's 1st Congressional District, while Rep. Tulsi Gabbard easily won re-election in the party nomination to represent Hawaii's 2nd Congressional District.

Updated at 8:34 p.m ET Saturday

The man who stole a plane with no one else on board from the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport late Friday has been identified as Richard Russell, 29, according to two unnamed law enforcement sources. He flew the plane for about an hour before crashing into a forest on a nearby island.

Russell was a resident of Pierce County, Wash., and "acted alone," the Pierce County Sheriff's Department tweeted, describing him as "suicidal."

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who leads Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer by a razor-thin initial vote tally in the Republican primary race for governor, said Thursday night that he would recuse himself from the vote-counting process.

Kobach told CNN Thursday night that he would be "happy to recuse" himself and would make a formal announcement Friday.

As of Thursday night Kobach leads Colyer by 121 votes, out of about 311,000 ballots cast in Tuesday's Republican gubernatorial primary, according to an Associated Press count.

The New York City Council passed legislation Wednesday to temporarily halt new licenses of for-hire vehicles like those of Uber and Lyft, in the first action by a major U.S. city to cap the growth of the ride-hailing services.

The city council passed a package of bills to regulate the ride-hailing industry, including setting a one-year cap on the number of Uber and Lyft cars on the streets to study effects on traffic congestion, and allowing city regulators to set a minimum pay rate for drivers.

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