Marketplace

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  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

With in-depth focus on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets, Marketplace is timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

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This post was updated on Sept. 17, 2018, at 4:25 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time.

Tariffs, but make it fashion

Sep 17, 2018

The Trump administration will impose tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese products next week as President Donald Trump first threatened in June. Hundreds of people have testified and submitted written comments about their impact, including Julia Hughes, president of the United States Fashion Industry Association. We'll chat with her, as well as Canadian aluminum producers stinging from the trade war. Plus: A conversation with Tender Greens CEO Denyelle Bruno.

The morning rush had slowed to a trickle at Los Angeles' main subway terminal, Union Station, but two police officers were still surveying the commuters on the escalator; first, with their eyes; then, through a laptop screen on top of a large black box on wheels.

“We wanted this to be obvious,”said Susan Walker, head of physical security for the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority, standing nearby.

(Markets Edition) The president on Monday morning tweeted about the “strong bargaining position” granted by tariffs, and that “cost increases have thus far been almost unnoticeable.” There are also more retaliatory threats from China. Then, we look at body-scanning technology, which will debut in Los Angeles in November. Could other cities follow suit? Also, we look at Monday night’s Emmys and how NBC is under pressure to boost ratings for the awards show.

The Emmys air tonight on NBC. Celebrities aplenty, lots of red carpet and the gowns but fewer and fewer people have been tuning in to see who takes home the awards for best in television. The Emmys has been the least watched of the awards shows over the past few years. Now there’s pressure to change that. Struggling to recover ratings, the television academy signed a contract keeping the cost of broadcast rights from climbing unless there are steady ratings gains.

 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(U.S. Edition) Switzerland’s financial watchdog group FINMA has uncovered corruption at the global bank Credit Suisse, which will now be overseen by an independent monitor. Then, McDonald’s workers in 10 cities are planning a lunchtime strike on Tuesday to protest alleged sexual harassment on the job. Also, we check in to see what states are doing to prevent kids from vaping after FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb threatened to pull certain e-cigarettes from the market.

New IMF warnings with just six months until Brexit

Sep 17, 2018

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … It’s just six months until Brexit, and we’ll hear from U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May, who is doubling down on her controversial plan to divorce her country from the European Union. Then, Unilever wants to scrap its dual-national share structure and move the company’s headquarters to the Netherlands. But one of the major shareholders is encouraging others to vote no. Afterwards, can cities be ageist, sexist, or racist?

Here at Marketplace, we're doing a yearlong project on the 10-year anniversary of the financial crisis called Divided Decade. At the center of it, of course, were dodgy housing loans that were packaged and resold as seemingly solid investments. They were known as mortgage-backed securities. Here's where the tech comes in: Back in the '90s, a guy named Michael Osinski and his wife, Isabel, wrote software that made it super simple to bundle loans into a security.

Here at Marketplace, we're doing a yearlong project on the 10-year anniversary of the financial crisis called Divided Decade. At the center of it, of course, were dodgy housing loans that were packaged and resold as seemingly solid investments. They were known as mortgage-backed securities. Here's where the tech comes in: Back in the '90s, a guy named Michael Osinski and his wife, Isabel, wrote software that made it super simple to bundle loans into a security.

Last year was the costliest hurricane season on record in the U.S., and Hurricane Irma was the fifth costliest storm of its kind in history. Storms like Irma have costs that can keep hurting people for a long time. For instance, the damage it did to citrus trees in Florida. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal checked in with Mark Wheeler, a citrus grower in central Florida, whose trees were damaged by Hurricane Irma, to see how business is one year after that storm.

The National Labor Relations Board has moved to roll back a rule that made union organizing a bit easier. The "joint employer" rule from the Obama era opened the way for workers at franchises, temp agencies and sub-contractors to bring the big companies at the top of the supply chain into their labor disputes. So, you could sue a big fast-food chain accused of blocking worker rights at its franchises, for instance, because the big company had some control over working conditions, scheduling, or union organizing activities.

Viewers of The Weather Channel may have noticed a lot of campaign ads this week as the midterm elections approach and more people tuned in to track Hurricane Florence.

According to NCC Media, the number of political advertisers on the channel grew from 59 last week to 83 this week.

Have you ever watched the crime show "CSI"? The forensic scientist, flashlight in hand, combs every inch of the murder scene for clues.

Forensic accountants do the same kind of work — but in the financial world. They investigate crimes like money laundering, fraud and tax evasion.  

“We’re like the accounting pathologists,” said Dawn Brolin, CEO of Powerful Accounting. “We come in and we will tell the story of how the crime happened.” The incriminating evidence comes from bank statements and ledgers. “Because numbers tell a story,” Brolin said. “Transactions tell a story.”

Holiday jobs outlook full of good cheer

Sep 14, 2018

We're now exactly 10 weeks from Black Friday, and while many American consumers are probably only just starting to think about their holiday shopping, the companies that sell us our holiday presents have been thinking about it for a while. And what they're thinking is that it’s going to be a strong retail season, and that they’re getting ready to hire a lot of workers.

The day the bank fell

Sep 14, 2018

When Lynn Gray went home on Friday, Sept. 12, 2008, she was expecting that her employer, Lehman Brothers, would be purchased over the weekend. Barclay’s and Bank of America were both considering saving it from bankruptcy. Things changed quickly. Gray's on the show today to tell us what it was like being in the building when Lehman fell and helped set off a worldwide crisis. Plus, a forensic accountant was a key witness in the trial of Paul Manafort. But what, exactly, is forensic accounting? We'll explain.

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