Domenico Montanaro

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's senior political editor/correspondent. Based in Washington, D.C., his work appears on air and online delivering analysis of the political climate in Washington and campaigns. He also helps edit political coverage and is the lead editor for Supreme Court coverage.

Montanaro joined NPR in 2015 and oversaw coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign, including for broadcast and digital.

Before joining NPR, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and taught high school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

A native of Queens, N.Y., Montanaro is a life-long Mets fan and college basketball junkie.

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Hillary Clinton has spent much of the summer fending off questions about her private email account during her time as secretary of state. Bernie Sanders is gaining on her in the polls. And there's a looming possible challenge from sitting Vice President Joe Biden.

That's a far cry from the beginning of this campaign when she was seen as an almost inevitable Democratic nominee.

Now, she's trying to regroup and make the case before the very people who will choose that nominee — not voters, but her base: the party establishment.

Alaska is on the "bucket lists" for a lot of people, but for President Obama it's on his famous list of things that rhyme with bucket.

When a wispy-haired, septuagenarian senator from Vermont with a Larry David-style and a life-long passion for talking about income inequality decided to run for president, not many took him seriously.

That's especially true, considering that senator, Bernie Sanders, was going up against the New York Yankees of Democratic politics — the Clintons.

But now Sanders is gaining in the polls, including in the gold-standard poll in Iowa — out Saturday night.

Donald Trump's been having a lot of fun at the expense of others lately.

Mitt Romney and Donald Trump's relationship had all the permanence of a Las Vegas wedding.

Perhaps Romney said it best when he took to the podium that fateful day in February of 2012 to accept Trump's endorsement.

"There are some things that you just can't imagine happening in your life. Uh, this is one of them," the eventual Republican nominee said to laughter.

Confirming rumors that he is seriously considering jumping into the 2016 presidential race, Vice President Biden acknowledged that he is indeed weighing whether to get into the contest.

But in a closed-conference call with Democratic National Committee officials, he noted that he and his family are trying to decide "whether or not there is the emotional fuel at this time to run." Biden's son Beau died of brain cancer in May.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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So that's how Ted Cruz is trying to stand out in the crowded GOP field. And now NPR political editor Domenico Montanaro is here to talk about how some of the others are working to differentiate themselves. Hey there, Domenico.

Hillary Clinton has "directed her team" to give the private email server that she used while Secretary of State to the Justice Department, a campaign aide confirmed to NPR's Tamara Keith.

Jeb Bush will release 33 years of tax returns later this afternoon, a Bush campaign aide confirms to NPR.

"This is more than any presidential candidate in the history of the United States," Bush spokeswoman Allie Brandenburger wrote in an email. "This display of transparency is consistent with the high level of disclosure he has practiced during his life in public office."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom share pieces that have kept them reading. They share tidbits using the #NPRreads hashtag — and on Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you four reads.

From Edith Chapin, NPR's acting executive editor:

This post has been updated.

A day after a shooting left nine dead in a historically black church in Charleston, S.C., President Obama mourned the losses and lamented the politics of gun control.

"At some point, we as a country will have to reckon with the fact that this type of mass violence does not happen in other advanced countries," Obama said from the White House Briefing Room. "It doesn't happen in other places with this kind of frequency. And it is in our power to do something about it."

Still, Obama noted that power is limited.

If Hillary Clinton wants to be president, Jeb Bush might be the candidate she most wants to run against.

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