Samantha Horton

Last month, we welcomed Samantha Horton to our station. She is Indiana Public Broadcasting reporter, mainly reporting on business and economic issues in the States of Indiana for WBAA. After graduated from Evansville University with a triple majors degree (International studies, Political science and Communication), Samantha worked for a Public Radio at Evansville for three years, and then she joined WBAA because she wanted to take a bigger role on reporting. So far she enjoyed working in WBAA as business and economy reporter.

In her leisure time, Samantha enjoys running, trying different craft beers and playing board games with her family members. A little fun fact about her is that she signed up Marathon last year and she will give anther try this year on November.

Samantha Horton/IPB News

Hoosiers in central Indiana will be able to watch the Indianapolis 500 live this weekend.

Samantha Horton/IPB News

The majority women’s team Paretta Autosport will make history racing in this year’s Indianapolis 500. The rookie team fought it out Sunday to secure the final position in the “Greatest Spectacle in Racing.”

Samantha Horton/IPB News

Scott Dixon will start in the pole position for the Indianapolis 500 for a fourth time. The one-time Indy 500 winner hopes to kiss the bricks again this year.

Doug Jaggers/WFYI

The Force Indy auto racing team made its debut recently at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The Black-owned team is already feeling the impact they’re making on motor sports.

Samantha Horton/IPB News

A land-based fish farm in Indiana is preparing the first commercial harvest of its genetically engineered salmon. AquaBounty’s fish is the first genetically modified animal for human consumption on the US market. The company said the full harvest, more than five tons, has already been sold. 

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

Global pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly is planning for employees working from home to return to their Indianapolis offices this summer. Officials say this is another step towards businesses returning to what operations were before the pandemic.

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

Eli Lilly is joining other pharmaceutical companies working to fight the surge of COVID-19 cases in India. The country has reported almost 4,000 deaths Wednesday and is averaging over 300,000 new cases a day. 

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

Indiana officials are making a second go of investing in capital projects around the state with the newly launched Indiana Regional Economic Acceleration and Development Initiative (READI). The program mirrors a previous version created by former Gov. Mike Pence.

Toyota is investing $803 million to further expand its facility in southwest Indiana. This is the most recent major investment the Japanese automaker has made over the last few years.

Wikimedia Commons

Apple plans to invest $100 million to build a new state-of-the-art distribution center in central Indiana as a part of its Advanced Manufacturing Fund.

Samantha Horton/IPB News

An ongoing shortage of semiconductor chips is causing automobile makers in Indiana to temporarily halt production. The problem is highlighting continued issues with the global supply chain.

Samantha Horton/IPB News

The Indianapolis 500 will bring fans back this May after having none at last year’s race, at 40 percent capacity.

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

A bill that will give health care providers additional protections from COVID-19 liability lawsuits is on its way to the governor’s desk. Some trial lawyers worry the bill will limit Hoosiers from seeking legal action for their loved ones.

(Pixabay)

The Indiana Chamber of Commerce expressed frustration that the state Senate is not creating a high enough tax on vaping devices or increasing the cigarette tax. The Senate’s proposed budget rolls back what the House approved earlier this session.

(Lauren Chapman/IPB News)

The percentage of small businesses saying they will have to possibly close in the next six months dropped from 25 percent last December to 13 percent in a recent survey, conducted by the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB).

(Lauren Chapman/IPB News)

NEW:

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indianapolis will relax coronavirus restrictions on the city’s bars and restaurants starting next week ahead of the upcoming Big Ten and NCAA men’s basketball tournaments. The changes announced Thursday will allow bars to operate at 50% capacity instead of 25% starting Monday, while restaurants will see their indoor restaurant capacity increase from 50% to 75%. Mayor Joe Hogsett says bars, restaurants and music venues will also be able to close two hours later, at 2 a.m. He says the relaxed restrictions were prompted by drops in the city’s COVID-19 cases and its coronavirus positivity rate, and not due to the upcoming Big Ten and NCAA men’s basketball tournaments.

(Governor Eric Holcomb/Flickr)

Gov. Eric Holcomb signed into law Thursday legislation giving businesses and institutions liability protections from most COVID-19 lawsuits.

(Samantha Horton/IPB News)

Cars drive by a nondescript strip mall on the westside of Indianapolis. The Carrier plant sits just on the other side of the intersection.

(AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)

The WNBA stood with major sporting leagues across the country postponing playoff games for several days last week. One Indiana Fever player said part of her role as a professional athlete is to advocate for social justice.

Copyright 2020 Indiana Public Radio. To see more, visit Indiana Public Radio.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

(Lauren Chapman/IPB News)

The U.S. economy showed its largest decline in more than 70 years last quarter. The broad measure of economic activity also points to areas where Indiana is struggling.

Copyright 2020 Indiana Public Radio. To see more, visit Indiana Public Radio.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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