Stateside Staff

Today on Stateside, top United Auto Workers union leaders are now working with federal investigators on the probe into corruption at the UAW. Plus, we talk to the Detroiter who is just one country away from having visited every United Nations recognized country. She is aiming to be the first black woman to do so. 

Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced Wednesday she would submit a supplemental spending plan to the state Legislature. That means she's throwing her budget priorities back to Republican lawmakers, after reworking and vetoing parts of the budget they sent to her.

Governor Whitmer told Stateside that the vetoes were necessary because the budget sent to her by the Republican-controlled legislature did not adequately fund roads and other high priority items. Whitmer says that legislators need to come back to the table to figure out a better plan.

 

Name-calling. Punching back. Finger-pointing. It's what we've come to expect out of Washington.

U.S. Representatives Fred Upton (R-6th District) and Debbie Dingell (D-12th District) are calling for a return to civility and collegiality at the nation's Capitol, and in America more broadly. 

They co-authored an op-ed in the Detroit News earlier this year, writing "A vibrant democratic republic depends on vigorous debate — but also recognizes the importance of compromise." 

Stateside spoke with Dingell and Upton Wednesday morning ahead of an appearance at the Detroit Economic Club.

 


Today on Stateside, Governor Gretchen Whitmer explains the reasoning behind her 147 line-item vetoes in the state budget she signed Monday night. Plus, Congresswoman Debbie Dingell and Congressman Fred Upton talk about civility in an era of partisanship and division. 

Governor Gretchen Whitmer on Monday unveiled a mountain of line-item vetoes to the state budget sent to her by GOP leaders in the Legislature. Rick Pluta is Michigan Radio's Capitol Bureau Chief, and Emily Lawler is a political reporter with MLive. They break down which items Whitmer crossed off of the GOP-crafted budget, the Republican response to her decisions, and what all of this says about how the governor and the Legislature will work together moving forward.

 


Today on Stateside, the state budget needs to be approved by Governor Gretchen Whitmer tonight to avoid a partial government shutdown. But the governor has been vocal about her displeasure with the bills sent to her by the state Legislature. So what are her options? Plus, how can Michigan do more to recruit and retain a diverse teaching staff? 

 


Today on Stateside, how the United Auto Worker's strike of General Motors is hitting workers' household budgets and the broader economy. Plus, the deadline for a state budget is October 1. Will Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the GOP-led state legislature be able to strike a deal before then and avoid a partial government shutdown? 

This Saturday, a ninth-grader from Detroit's Cass Tech High School will board a jet for Mumbai, India. Fourteen-year-old Charisse Woods will represent Detroit at the World Youth Chess Championships. We talked to Woods about how she got her start in chess, and her aspirations to become a National Master, a title very few chess players ever earn.

The pressure is on to avoid a partial government shutdown by the October 1 deadline. The Legislature has wrapped up work and approved a new $59.9 billion budget for fiscal year 2020. But now the 14 budget bills go to Governor Gretchen Whitmer, who says they are "a mess." Zach Gorchow of Gongwer goes through what options Governor Whitmer has now that the budget is on her desk.

 


Today on Stateside, the GOP-controlled Michigan Legislature passed a new budget. Governor Gretchen Whitmer declared it "a mess." What are her options now? Plus, a Detroit man returns home after being incarcerated in China for three years.

 


The constant barrage of news about climate change, drinking water contamination, and pollution in the Great Lakes region can feel overwhelming. If you care, it’s hard to know what to do or where to start.

That's where Stateside's new series comes in. We're featuring ordinary people who identified a problem – no matter how big or small – and chose to act. 

The Michigan Republican Party gathered on Mackinac Island over the weekend for the Mackinac Republican Leadership Conference, which was attended by Vice President Mike Pence. Harbor Strategic Public Affairs CEO John Sellek was also at the conference. He joined Stateside to talk about how national shifts in the Republican Party are playing out in Michigan, and what state Republican leaders see as their major challenges and best strategy going into the 2020 presidential election.

 


If you've purchased beer lately, you've probably noticed the local craft beer section has grown in your grocery store. There's been a rapid expansion of the craft brewing industry in Michigan over the past decade. 

Michigan is the fourth-largest beer state in the nation. Currently, there are more than 350 breweries making a huge variety of beers. But some small brewers say that number may not be as big as it could be, and they say state law makes it hard for them to grow their business.

 


Today on Stateside, students across Michigan take to the streets to voice their concerns about climate change. Plus, the Pontiac Silverdome may be developed into an Amazon distribution center.

 

“Climate strikes” are being held around the world today, including here in Michigan. The youth-led movement aims to pressure corporations and governments to do more to reduce the greenhouse gases that are causing climate change.

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