Stateside Staff

Today on Stateside, we hear from two Catholics who have been pushing for changes in their dioceses in response to the allegations of sexual abuse by priests. Plus, Afrofuturism was spotlighted for an international audience in last year’s wildly successful film Black Panther. But the philosophy and art of Afrofuturism have had a home in Detroit for decades.

Today on Stateside, a new plan to boost Detroit says restoring the city's African-American middle class is key to a successful revitalization effort. Plus, we hear about the Anishinaabe Theatre Exchange, a program that draws on indigenous storytelling traditions to talk about current social issues.

Today on Stateside, the EPA on Thursday released a plan to deal with contamination from per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances – better known as PFAS. U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee says the plan shows the agency is “dragging their feet.” Plus, what it’s like to straddle two worlds as the first person in your family to go to college.

Today on Stateside, we hear reactions from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle, as well as some Michigan teachers, on the plans Governor Gretchen Whitmer laid out during the State of the State speech. Plus, we talk to two sisters from Rochester Hills who started the nonprofit “Girls of the Crescent” to empower Muslim girls through books and reading. 

What do you do when you’re looking for a certain type of book in the library and you come up empty-handed? 

Sisters Zena and Mena Nasiri first experienced that dilemma in fourth grade. A research project required them to read about someone they looked up to, but when they went to their local library to find biographies about Muslim women they admired, they couldn’t find any. 

We often hear politicians use buzzwords: things like “media elite,” “fake news,” and “welfare state.”

Some of those seem straightforward enough. Others, not so much.

One Michigan Radio listener, Ellen Rusten, had a question about a phrase you’ve probably heard come out of a politician's mouth: "business-friendly." Rusten wanted to know, just what does that popular buzzword actually mean?

Today on Stateside, Congressman John Dingell passed away Thursday. Two of his longtime friends from across the aisle, U.S. Rep. Fred Upton and Detroit News columnist Nolan Finley, reflect on the legacy of “the Dean.” Plus, Republicans push back against Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s attempts to restructure the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality. And we end the week with a cocktail that sounds like spring, but tastes like winter citrus.

Today on Stateside, we hear thoughts from both sides of the aisle about the State of Union address last night, and President Trump's contention that: "If there's going to be peace and legislation, there cannot be war and investigation." Plus, we transport back to 1860s Saginaw, Michigan to learn about the first African-American owned photography studio in the state. 

A leading architect and designer from Michigan died this week.

Florence Knoll Bassett was known for changing how we understand office space in the U.S. She was a giant of mid-century modern design, the style people may associate with the Mad Men-era.

Today on Stateside, bitter cold during this week’s polar vortex, combined with a fire at a Consumers Energy natural gas plant, led to an energy crisis. What does that tell us about the state of our energy infrastructure? Plus, remembering the Saginaw-born woman who revolutionized workplace design and helped usher in the era of the open office.

Today on Stateside, we find out why Michigan utilities asked customers to turn down their heat during record-breaking cold weather in the Midwest. Plus, a new report finds Michigan State University violated federal campus safety laws. The report also includes new information about MSU officials who were told about Larry Nassar's abuse and failed to report it to authorities. 

Today on Stateside, we check in with a fire department, an animal rescue group, and homeless advocates to see what work is like for them during the record-setting cold weather. We also talk with an artist whose first large-scale museum exhibition was inspired by her time in Flint. 


He was a respectable man. He never brandished a gun with the intention to kill, never spoke profane language, and never used incorrect grammar or slang. He was always mysteriously masked and made a vow to fight injustice. He is famously known as "The Lone Ranger.”

 

Today on Stateside, we talk to a biologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration about the aftermath of the partial government shutdown. Plus, Rep. Fred Upton, R, explains why the EPA needs to set PFAS standards for drinking water. 

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