Steve Carmody

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?

My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.

 

How did you get involved in radio?

I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  

 

What is your favorite way to spend your free time?

I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)

 

What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?

Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.

 

What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?

Zilch. I don’t listen to music.

 

What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?

This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.

 

What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?

I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.

 

What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?

The ability to cook.

 

What do you like best about working in public radio?

I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.

 

If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?

No one really.

 

Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?

The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.

 

What would your perfect meal consist of?

A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.

 

What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?

The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.

 

What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?

That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).

 

What else would you like people to know about you?

I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Gasoline prices are dropping in Michigan.   

Prices per gallon have dropped by roughly 40 cents in the past month.   The statewide average is about $3.20.

But if you know where to look, you can save a lot more.

Motorists in parts of West Michigan are now paying as little as $2.75 a gallon. By comparison, in Ann Arbor, prices are still hovering around $3.30.

Time is running out before Election Day, and some groups think their money would be better spent elsewhere.

The Associated Press reports Republican groups are pulling ad buys supporting U.S. Senate Candidate Terri Lynn Land.

The National Republican Senatorial Committee pulled nearly $1 million in ads for the weeks of Oct. 21 and Oct. 28, according to a political operative who tracks ad spending. Democrat Gary Peters leads Republican Terri Lynn Land in Michigan.

Another big name Republican is coming to Michigan to get out the vote. 

Former Florida governor and potential future presidential candidate Jeb Bush is scheduled to make a whirlwind swing through Michigan on Monday.

Bush is scheduled to appear at events in Grand Rapids, Lansing and Troy.

Michigan is becoming a popular stop for big name politicos.

Former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney campaigned for GOP candidates last week in Livonia.

First Lady Michelle Obama will be in Michigan on Friday.

She'll be campaigning for Democratic candidates.

The White House says the First Lady will appear at a campaign event in Detroit on Friday.  She’ll be sharing the stage with U.S. Senate candidate Gary Peters and gubernatorial candidate Mark Schauer.

State House Democrats are once again calling for a repeal of Michigan’s tax on pensions.

The 2011 tax code rewrite means some retirees are paying taxes on previously untaxed pension income.

State Rep. Theresa Abed, D-Grand Ledge, says it’s unfair to seniors.

“It is wrong to balance the budget on the backs of those on a fixed income with no way to make it up,” says Abed.

The pension tax is expected to generate about $350 million this year.

A bill to repeal the pension tax has been languishing in the Legislature since 2013.

The race for Michigan governor is moving into its final weeks.

Gov. Rick Snyder held the first of 10 town hall events last night in Kalamazoo on the campus of Western Michigan University.

  

Snyder was greeted by a group that wants to make him a one-term governor.  Protester JoeAnne Peterson is a retired teacher who's angry with the governor for several reasons, including right-to-work laws and increasing taxes on Michigan pensioners.

“I do have a right to say you took. You didn’t ask,” Peterson said.

State health officials are once again urging more parents to get their children immunized against preventable diseases.

Michigan has the fourth-highest percentage of parents who choose for non-medical reasons not to have their children vaccinated against whooping cough, measles, and other diseases.

This story was updated at 6:27 am on 9-10-14

State lawmakers got an earful today from people who want townships to have the ability to say no to oil and gas companies.

A 2011 amendment to the Michigan Zoning Enabling Act specifically bars townships from preventing conventional drilling. 

It appears highly unlikely there will be a televised debate between Michigan’s two major-party candidates for U.S. Senate this fall. 

It’s not for a lack of potential debate venues. Two TV stations and Michigan State University have offered to host a debate between Republican Terri Lynn Land and Democrat Gary Peters.      

The Peters campaign has accepted those invitations, but Land’s campaign has not.

Michigan hunters could find wolves in their crosshairs again later this year, if the state House approves legislation on Wednesday.

Last year, hunters killed 22 wolves in a state-sanctioned hunt in the Upper Peninsula.

Plans for another wolf hunt this fall were shelved after opponents collected enough signatures to put the issue on the November ballot. They did so again when state lawmakers passed another law to authorize a wolf hunt.

Michigan school districts are gearing up for the beginning of the school year.

Many school districts are holding kickoff events, including Grand Rapids Public Schools which drew hundreds of grade-school students and parents today.

Teresa Weatherall-Neal is Grand Rapids' school superintendent. She says it’s important for parents and children to realize summer is almost over.

"We need people to now switch gears. Summer is over. We need you to start thinking about school,” says Weatherall-Neal. “It’s time to come back.”

A federal court ruling today could affect tens of thousands of Michiganders who got health insurance through Obamacare.

More than 237,000 of the 272,000 Michiganders who signed up for Obamacare selected a plan through the marketplace with federal financial assistance.  The tax credits helped subsidize health insurance payments for low- and moderate-income people.

The nation’s former Treasury Secretary has an idea about how to bring more foreign investment to the Great Lakes region. He’s coming to Detroit today to pitch it to the city’s business leaders.

Henry Paulson sees the Great Lakes region as a place presenting a lot of opportunities for emerging markets, like China, to invest.

Paulson was President George W. Bush’s Treasury Secretary during the 2008 financial crisis. He championed the $700 billion bailout of the nation’s banks. Before that, Paulson headed the investment firm of Goldman Sachs.

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