Steve Carmody

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?

My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.

 

How did you get involved in radio?

I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  

 

What is your favorite way to spend your free time?

I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)

 

What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?

Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.

 

What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?

Zilch. I don’t listen to music.

 

What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?

This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.

 

What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?

I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.

 

What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?

The ability to cook.

 

What do you like best about working in public radio?

I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.

 

If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?

No one really.

 

Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?

The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.

 

What would your perfect meal consist of?

A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.

 

What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?

The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.

 

What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?

That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).

 

What else would you like people to know about you?

I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Some of the state workers indicted as part of the Flint water crisis investigation may soon return to work.

Last week, state prosecutors dismissed charges against eight current and former government officials as they begin to reassess the investigation.

Michigan legislators may soon vote to slap a warning label on marijuana products aimed at pregnant and nursing mothers. 

While it is discouraged by medical professionals, some women use cannabis products during pregnancy to ease the effects of morning sickness. 

Detroit and Lansing are among ten U.S. cities picked to be part of an effort to improve economic mobility.

Foundations linked to billionaires Michael Bloomberg, Bill Gates, and Steve Ballmer are behind the effort to improve the future of America’s children.

A judge has decided to ignore mistakes made by some of the four Flint mayoral candidates and allow all of them to appear on the August primary ballot.

The candidates filed legal briefs last week defending each of their positions to be on the ballot, while also raising questions about their opponents. The conflicting legal claims opened the possibility that one or all four candidates would be dropped from the ballot, forcing them to run write-in campaigns.

A new report says a growing percentage of Michigan’s children live in poverty.

The annual Kids Count Data Book is produced by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The foundation has been producing the annual Kids Count report for 30 years. 

The 2019 report ranks Michigan 32nd in the nation for overall child well-being.

Demolition work will soon begin at a long-abandoned trailer park in Flint.

Shady Acres closed in 2015.  But the 20-acre park is overgrown, and overwhelmed with trash and rotting mobile homes.

Monday morning, a circuit court judge will hear a case that could force all the candidates running for Flint mayor off the August primary ballot.

It appears all four candidates who qualified for a spot on the primary ballot made mistakes in their paperwork filed with the city clerk. One of the candidates even checked “no” on the question asking whether candidates met the qualifications to be a candidate for mayor. 

The judge may decide if the mistakes disqualify one or all the candidates.

Caro residents tried to make the case to keep their local state psychiatric center open at a town hall meeting Thursday.

Earlier this year, the Whitmer administration halted work on a new $115 million facility in Caro.   

After three years, the criminal probe into the Flint water crisis is back to square one.

The Flint Water Crisis prosecution team, working under the aegis of Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel, has dismissed without prejudice all pending criminal cases brought by the former Office of Special Counsel.

A dispute between the state health department and a Flint hospital is escalating.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services is ordering McLaren Hospital in Flint to immediately correct conditions in its facility to reduce the risk of future exposure to Legionella at the hospital.

General Motors is investing $150 million to boost production at its Flint assembly plant. Company officials made the announcement at the plant on Wednesday.

The plant produces the automaker’s profitable heavy duty pick-up trucks. GM announced earlier this year that it would add another 1,000  jobs in Flint for the rollout of the 2020 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra.

In Flint Wednesday, GM President Mark Reuss said it’s important for the automaker to minimize logistical costs across its supply chain.

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer says she's open to renew talks with Enbridge Energy about the future of its oil pipeline through the Mackinac Straits.

Last week, Enbridge – which is a Michigan Radio sponsor – asked the state Court of Claims to consider the legality of agreements it reached with former Governor Rick Snyder to build an oil pipeline tunnel.

Michigan’s attorney general has until June 27 to respond to Enbridge’s lawsuit.

This week, the Michigan Board of Education is scheduled to consider new social studies curriculum standards. 

The path these revised social studies standards have taken could be a civics lesson in itself.

Back in 2018, educators and liberal groups rallied against a proposal drafted with strong input from conservative groups. The proposal called for dropping references to “gay rights,”  "Roe vs Wade” and "climate change.” It also called for replacing the phrase “democratic values” with “core values.”

Under pressure, the Michigan Department of Education pulled the proposal.  

The pace of home flipping in Michigan’s largest markets is quickening.

Home flipping is where someone buys a home, quickly renovates it and tries to sell it for a profit.

Todd Teta is the chief product officer at ATTOM Data Solutions, a company that tracks the real estate market.

He says Michigan’s relatively low home prices have been attractive to flippers.

On Saturday, soap box derby racers made their first appearance in Flint for the first time in more than two decades.

The announcer dramatically counts down, “3, 2, 1 GO….” to start each race.

Starting slowly but gaining speed, a pair of tween drivers pilot their soap box race cars down from the crest of Chevy Commons to Kettering University’s Mobility Research Center.

Soap box derby racing has a long history in Flint, going back to the 1930s. But this is the first time since the 90s there has been a sanctioned race.

Another Democratic presidential candidate spent a few hours this weekend shaking hands with voters in Michigan.

Julian Castro is one of nearly two dozen Democrats running to challenge President Donald Trump in 2020. Castro was the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development under President Obama. He is also the former mayor of San Antonio.

In Flint on Saturday, he toured the city’s farmers’ market and met with residents still struggling with the lingering effects of the city’s water crisis.

Genesee County health officials are reporting the county’s first possible death from Legionnaires' disease this year.

Legionnaires is a type of pneumonia that sometimes strikes people who are older, have a history of smoking, chronic lung disease or have poor immune function. Legionnaires' disease doesn't spread from person to person. Instead, the Legionella bacteria spreads through the air, often through contaminated ventilation systems in large buildings. 

An internal fight on the Flint city council is a step closer toward spilling out into this fall’s general election.

The Genesee County Election Commission approved recall petition language Thursday against one of four Flint city council members.

Michigan’s Attorney General is asking three companies to turn over information about a major computer data breach.  

New York-based American Medical Collection Agency (AMCA) provides medical debt collection services to health providers and health plans.   

U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) isn’t the only Democrat running for president campaigning in Michigan Tuesday.

Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee is positioning himself as the climate change candidate. He toured parts of Detroit to promote his “evergreen economy” plan.

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver could soon use her veto pen to strike down some changes the city council approved to the city budget on Monday night.

The city council tacked on a few amendments to the spending plan, including adding $1.7 million to the fire department budget. 

Published reports claim a police investigation into allegations of sexual abuse by priests turned up a file labelled "victim list" during a raid on Catholic church properties in Saginaw. 

MLive and the Saginaw News obtained the paperwork connected to a warrant executed in March of last year. 

The race to the 2020 presidential election makes another stop in Michigan this week.

U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) is the latest Democrat running for president to schedule campaign stops in Michigan. Warren will make appearances in Lansing and Detroit on Tuesday.

Some Lansing public library branches will be offering curbside pickup starting Monday.

Scott Duimstra is the executive director of the Capitol Area District Library.  

State marijuana regulators hope to get emergency rules in place for Michigan’s recreational marijuana market this month.

Recreational marijuana use has been legal in Michigan since the passage of last year’s state ballot question. But recreational sales are still in limbo, as the Michigan Marijuana Regulatory Agency works on the rules.  

Director Andrew Brisbo hopes to start taking applications for recreational cannabis businesses this fall.

Soggy soil is slowing corn and soybean planting in Michigan.

The Michigan Farm Bureau’s Theresa Sisung says only a third of the state’s corn crop is in the ground and only about a quarter of the soybean crop. 

U.S. Sen. Gary Peters (D-MI) says he is concerned about recent North Korea missile tests, even if President Trump says he’s not.

North Korea tested short-range ballistic missiles on May 4 and May 9, ending a pause in launches that began in late 2017.

The tests have been seen as a way for North Korea to pressure Washington to soften its stance on easing sanctions against it without actually causing the negotiations to collapse.

The president told reporters in Tokyo he is not “personally” bothered by the recent tests.  

More than a million people are expected to take to Michigan’s highways this Memorial Day weekend.  

There will also be plenty of law enforcement officials on the road.

AAA is predicting this will be the busiest Memorial Day Weekend in more than a decade.

1.3 million Michiganders are expected to drive, fly or otherwise travel this weekend. AAA says more than a million will hit the road for the unofficial start of the summer travel season.

Juwan Howard, former member of the Fab Five, will be the University of Michigan’s next men’s basketball coach.

U of M officials have been looking for a new men’s basketball coach since the sudden departure of John Beilein to the NBA's Cleveland Cavaliers.

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