Steve Carmody

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?

My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.

 

How did you get involved in radio?

I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  

 

What is your favorite way to spend your free time?

I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)

 

What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?

Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.

 

What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?

Zilch. I don’t listen to music.

 

What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?

This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.

 

What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?

I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.

 

What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?

The ability to cook.

 

What do you like best about working in public radio?

I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.

 

If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?

No one really.

 

Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?

The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.

 

What would your perfect meal consist of?

A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.

 

What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?

The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.

 

What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?

That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).

 

What else would you like people to know about you?

I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

School officials are worried about the Legislature’s latest plan to help financially troubled school districts.

The state House Financial Liability Reform committee is expected to take up seven bills on Thursday that would create an early warning system to identify financially troubled schools. The bills would require enhanced deficit elimination plans and increase the cap on emergency loans to school districts.

Michigan can expect “brisk” job growth at the start of 2015, according to a new report.

Twenty-five percent of Michigan employers tell Manpower they expect to hire new people during the first three months of 2015. Only Hawaii and North Dakota posted higher numbers.   

Therapy dogs are helping Michigan State University students take a break this week while they study for their final exams. 

The dogs are available to students at two of the libraries on campus where some students practically live during finals week.

Several Michigan colleges and universities took part in a White House conference on math and science education this past week. 

The college initiative summit focused on better preparing students to succeed in college.

State wildlife officials are looking for wolf poachers in the Upper Peninsula.

Two wolves were killed last month in Mackinac and Schoolcraft counties.

In one case, a tracking collar on one of the wolves was removed. 

Michigan hospitals may have to plan on receiving more flu patients this year.

Centers for Disease Control officials say the vaccine does not protect well against the dominant strain (H3N2) seen most commonly so far this year.

Michigan motorists are spending less and smiling more at the gas pump these days.

Having trouble with your boss?

A new Michigan State University study suggests your job performance will improve if you and your boss can at least “see eye to eye.”

MSU researchers say employers and employees understanding their relationship issues is more important that the quality of the relationship.

The study of 280 employees and their bosses found job motivation suffered when an employee believed he or she had a good relationship with the boss but the boss saw it differently.

Employee motivation was higher when the worker and supervisor saw eye-to-eye about the relationship, even when it was poor.

The study appears in the Academy of Management Journal.

Michigan universities are a major draw to international college students, according to new report.

The Institute for International Education’s annual Open Doors report ranks the state of Michigan has having the ninth-largest population of international college students, nearly 30,000. 

Michigan lawmakers are acting quickly on legislation to legalize riding-sharing companies like Uber and Lyft.

The app-based taxi-like service links people who need a ride with willing motorists.

The services appear to be in violation of state law. Some cities, like Ann Arbor, have tried to prevent them from operating. Others, like Lansing, have been more welcoming.

Michigan’s ethanol industry leaders are touting a new study that claims ethanol is reducing greenhouse gas emissions.   

The study comes as a fight is brewing in Washington over federal Renewable Fuel Standards.

Nearly two-thirds of Michigan retailers are expecting a better holiday shopping season this year.

The Michigan Retailers Association polled its members about their expectations for the upcoming holiday shopping season and found 63% predict better sales than last year, while 28% expect sales will be more than 5% better.

Nationally, sales are expected to rise by 4%.

Two Michigan icons are among those being singled out for a special honor.

Longtime congressman John Dingell and music legend Stevie Wonder don’t have a lot in common.  But they are being recognized as national treasures.

The White House announced Monday Dingell and Wonder are among the latest recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. 

The White House press office says Dingell is being honored for his lifetime of public service:

A new University of Michigan study says we should rethink how we care for teens and young adults who are victims of violence.

For some young people, violent injuries occur with a frequency similar to someone with a “chronic disease”. 

This Halloween, ‘trick or treaters’ may be greeted by more than the usual scary sights and sounds in Michigan.

Many homes will have teal colored pumpkins on their doorsteps. 

The teal pumpkins are a sign that that house will be handing out special treats to children with food allergies.

Veronica LaFamina is with the group ‘Food Allergy Research and Education’ or FARE.   She says one in 13 children have a serious food allergy.

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