Arcelor Mittal

Tyler Lake/WTIU

Since ArcelorMittal’s Burns Harbor facility spilled cyanide and ammonia into a Lake Michigan waterway in August, the state has required the plant to send daily test results to the Indiana Department of Environmental Management. Now the agency says the company has been distorting those results. 

Ken Lund/Flickr

Two environmental groups made good on their promise to sue steelmaker ArcelorMittal on Wednesday. They say the company hasn’t been held accountable for more than 100 violations at its northwest Indiana facility — including a chemical spill that killed more than 3,000 fish in August. 

The plaintiffs want the company to pay for past violations and to make repairs to the plant so its in compliance.

Tyler Lake/WTIU

The mayor of Portage is calling for several changes to the way ArcelorMittal operates. Last week, the Indiana Department of Environmental Management released an investigative report on the company’s August spill of cyanide and ammonia into a Lake Michigan waterway that killed about 3,000 fish.

Among other things, it showed that ArcelorMittal failed to notify IDEM and the public soon enough about problems at the plant.

Courtesy of IDEM

The state says ArcelorMittal failed to notify the public soon enough about problems that led to a cyanide and ammonia spill in a Lake Michigan tributary. That’s according to an investigative report by the Indiana Department of Environmental Management. 

Tyler Lake/WTIU

The country’s newest national park isn’t like many of the others — it’s surrounded by some of the largest industrial companies in the U.S. While Indiana Dunes’ new designation has drawn national attention, so have recent industrial spills in nearby Lake Michigan waterways.

But will the park’s designation pressure industrial companies to clean up their act? 

Tyler Lake/WTIU

Two environmental groups say they’ll sue northwest Indiana steel company ArcelorMittal if the government doesn’t make it pay for environmental violations. 

In August, the company’s Burns Harbor facility discharged excess cyanide and ammonia into the Little Calumet River, killing about 3,000 fish and forcing beaches to close temporarily.

Galina Ovtcharova & Alexei Ovtcharov/Fotki

U.S. Steel had yet another oil leak on Friday. An official with the northwest Indiana company says it found a “light, intermittent oil sheen” near one of its pipes that discharges into Lake Michigan waterways. 

This comes just weeks after another leak from U.S. Steel and a chemical spill from ArcelorMittal that killed 3,000 fish. Residents and environmentalists are hoping this won’t become “the new normal.”