CDC

Bruce A. Taylor/NH State Police Forensic Lab/National Institute of Standards and Technology

Drug overdose deaths in the U.S. spiked nearly 30 percent during the pandemic and reached the highest level ever recorded, according to data released Wednesday from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

Hoosiers 5 and older can be registered for appointments to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. The announcement from the Indiana Department of Health follows federal approval.

Alan Mbathi/IPB News

The Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention approved the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for emergency use in kids 12 and older in mid-May. On Nov. 2, the CDC added its approval for 5- to 11-year-olds. 

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

Now that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s advisory committee recommends COVID-19 vaccinations for kids 5 and older, pediatric doctors are making their case to parents. A Riley Children’s Hospital physician said that means dispelling misinformation.

Elkhart County Health Department

Two more members of the Elkhart County Board of Health are leaving in the latest fallout from the County Council’s unanimous September vote to reject a Centers for Disease Control grant.

Dr. Ebenezer Kio, an oncologist, and Dr. Donald Findlay, a retired dentist, informed the board late last week that they would resign at the end of the year.

And Kio said the council’s decision to reject the $3 million grant played a role in his resignation.

WVPE News

St. Joseph County’s 2022 budget and a Centers for Disease control grant focused on minority communities will now go into effect after the County Council overrode last week’s vetoes by the County Commissioners Wednesday night.

Screenshot captured via Zoom

The St. Joseph County Board of Commissioners voted to deny federal funding Tuesday that allows the county health department to hire more community health workers. That’s after the Elkhart County Council denied an application for the same grant last month. 

Ball State: Employee COVID-19 vaccination numbers differ by type of job

Oct 8, 2021
Ball State University

Ball State University has a wide gap in employee COVID-19 vaccinations by type of job, according to internal data.

Justin Hicks/IPB News

The Indiana Department of Health announced Friday Pfizer booster shots of the COVID-19 vaccine are now available for certain groups of Hoosiers. 

Captured via YouTube

The Elkhart County Council voted unanimously Saturday to not apply for a federal health grant that would have helped educate minority populations about chronic diseases.

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

After the U.S. Supreme Court recently blocked the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's eviction moratorium, there’s a brighter spotlight than ever on evictions, which are increasing in number even as they continued throughout most of the pandemic.

Justin Hicks/IPB News

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention eviction moratorium, which the U.S. Supreme Court ended last month, was somewhat effective in keeping people in their homes. But the state’s moratorium, in place last year during the first few months of the pandemic, was far more effective.

Princeton University Eviction Lab


Judy Fox is a University of Notre Dame law professor and directs the school’s Economic Justice Clinic. She’s represented low-income clients on eviction cases for more than two decades but said now is the worst she’s ever seen.

Indiana Department of Health

 


According to the state’s COVID-19 tracking map, Fulton, Pulaski, Marshall and Kosciusko counties are now in the more serious “orange” category, which indicates high spread of the virus.

Jennifer Weingart / WVPE Public Radio

The Berrien County Health Department is recommending that all residents wear masks indoors, regardless of vaccination status. 

The Centers for Disease Control list Berrien County as having “substantial” spread of the highly transmissible Delta variant of the coronavirus. 

Indiana Department of Health


For the first time since April, all WVPE listener counties are back in the “yellow” category, indicating moderate spread of the virus, on the state’s COVID-19 tracking map. Last week, St. Joseph, Marshall and Starke counties were still in the “blue” category, indicating low spread of the virus.

Justin Hicks / IPB News

In a surprise to many, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a new eviction moratorium Tuesday, targeting areas of the country that are at higher risk for spread of COVID-19.

Jeanie Lindsay/IPB News

The South Bend Community School Corporation has implemented a universal face mask mandate for this academic year. Seven public commenters spoke against the measure, but it passed 5-0 with one abstention from board member Jeanette McCullough.

Jeanie Lindsay/IPB News

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced last week it recommends people wear masks in schools as COVID-19 cases surge. It's prompting some Hoosier schools to revise their policies, while others are waiting to make decisions based on local COVID-19 data, as many near – or have already started – a new academic year. 

Brandon Smith / IPB News

Gov. Eric Holcomb opted not to reimpose any COVID-19 restrictions Thursday as he extended the state’s public health emergency for another month.

Justin Hicks / IPB News

Gov. Eric Holcomb will decide later this week whether to reimpose any COVID-19 restrictions as the delta variant surges in Indiana.

CDC Chief Urges Michigan To 'Close Things Down' Amid Spike

Apr 12, 2021
Courtesy of the Governor's Office

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says Michigan should “close things down” to help address surging coronavirus infections. Dr. Rochelle Walensky's statement Monday comes as Gov. Gretchen Whitmer instead urges people to voluntarily restrict certain activities. Whitmer wants the federal government to send additional doses to the state, but the administration of President Joe Biden has stuck with allocating proportionally by population. Walensky says shutting things down would help flatten the curve.

(Justin Hicks/IPB News)

Indiana health officials say new COVID-19 quarantine guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention should help health care workers, teachers and students get back to work and school quicker.

ISDH

During Indiana's weekly COVID-19 update, State Health Commissioner Dr. Kris Box gave guidelines about how communities should handle Halloween and trick-or-treating. 

She passed along guidance handed down by the CDC. 

Box also broke down the risk of Halloween activities into low, moderate and high categories. 

The screenshots (below) provide more details. 

Liam James Doyle/NPR

Members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force are briefing a Senate panel on the federal response to the pandemic. Witnesses include Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health and CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield. This is expected to start at 10am. 

https://www.facebook.com/CDC/photos/a.434654756025/10156416804901026/?type=1&theater

Breaking News:

The CDC issued new guidelines Sunday night regarding the recommended size of gatherings. The guidance comes as the agency works to try and limit the spread of the coronavirus.

Darian Benson/IPB News

The Indiana State Department of Health announced Thursday it has initiated its Pandemic Preparedness and Response Plan in reaction to the global coronavirus outbreak.

Indiana State Health Commissioner Kris Box says steps outlined for the flu pandemic are being repurposed for the COVID-19, coronavirus. 

“Indiana has been actively working to prepare for the eventuality that COVID-19 gains a stronger foothold in the United States,” Box says.

Indiana Experiencing Widespread Flu Activity

Dec 9, 2019
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/usmap.htm

The beginning of flu season is hitting Indiana especially hard this year.

Indiana has been upgraded to “Widespread” flu activity which is the highest level possible. That’s according to the latest CDC Influenza Surveillance Report.

FDA

The state will receive $21 million over the next three years to prevent drug overdose deaths.

The money from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be used to improve data collection, increase prescription drug monitoring and provide harm reduction training. 

READ MORE: Report: Indiana Losing Out On Federal Opioid Funding

Lauren Chapman

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