Feature

Tom Labuzienski / WVPE

Live music is back! “Aha with Alastair” is back!

Alastair Willis, music director of the South Bend Symphony Orchestra, says "I don’t know about you, but after such a challenging past 18 months, the power of live orchestral music means even more to me now."

The orchestra opens its season on Saturday, September 25 th, at 7:30 PM and Sunday, September 26 th, at 2:30 PM at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center at Notre Dame with a sparkling program of Jessie Montgomery, Adam Neiman and Pyotr Ilych Tchaikovsky.

Michiana Chronicles: COVID intermission continued

Sep 23, 2021

Having moseyed down U.S. Highway 1 to Key West in June, we took a respite at home to see if we were infected by any of the unvaccinated and unmasked in the southerly climes. Finding ourselves safe, thanks to our vaccination and mask-wearing, in late July we decided to venture to the other end of the spectrum, U.S. Highway 1 in Maine.

The U.S. has secured more doses than the country’s COVID-19 vaccine needs. But around the world, millions of people have no access to vaccines in their home countries. And that makes some people travel thousands of miles to get a shot here in the U.S. — if they can afford it.

Brett McNeil

Well, it’s been a quiet week in Michianapolis, Michiana, my Indiana home, here on the banks of the Saint I Ain’t River.

I ran into a station honcho this summer who asked why these Michiana Chronicles essays can’t sound more like Lake Wobegon. That got me thinking. I remember that old hokum. I follow the horseshoe scores in the Mishawaka Enterprise. Let’s do it. Let’s serve up some rhubarb pie.

Gemma DiCarlo/WVPE

Though many businesses start with a lifelong dream, Crossroads Solar is not that company. Co-founder Patrick Regan said he never thought he’d be making solar panels.

Ken Smith

This is April Lidinsky.

And I am Debra Stanley.

April: thank you so much for making time to have a conversation with me. It’s always wonderful to be with you, and, you know, you just have my deep respect for all the public health conversations you’ve had, around HIV/AIDS, around sexuality in our community, and other topics, as well. I consider it my great good fortune to have watched you teach a sexuality education course to high schoolers, and to see how you have a real genius, I think, for reaching people where they are. 

Drop In Childhood Immunizations Worries Pediatricians

Sep 8, 2021

In the decades he’s spent as a pediatrician, Dr. Christopher Wilhelm has never had to treat a child with rubella.

“People have just been so used to getting shots and getting their vaccines, and that’s keeping disease down of many things that were very traumatic to children," Wilhelm said.

Photos provided by Russell Gunn and Mike Struwin. Photo by Melissa Stilwell

The Sauce' with host Dawn Burns is back for the program's September installment Monday September 13th at 9:00pm eastern.

Enjoy this one-hour monthly radio broadcast focusing on the arts, music and culture in the Michiana area. Celebrate the vibrant and flavorful melting pot of local and regional talent. The Sauce is produced by Karl Smith (J:Cubed Jazz to the 3rd power). 

 

 

Alex Paul, WTIU/WFIU News

Indiana has been famously anti-pot for a while now.  

The state was one of the first to ban cannabis without a prescription back in 1913, as Eli Lilly cultivated one of the nation’s biggest marijuana farms. When the federal government cracked down on the plant in 1937, Indiana followed suit with some of the nation’s toughest state-level restrictions.  

PETER DOMINOWSKI / WBOI

The Association of Zoos and Aquariums chooses zookeepers to manage the survival plans and studbooks for different species throughout North America. These keepers are tasked with keeping the species diverse and healthy in zoos throughout the country.

Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo boasts two of these coordinators.

A studbook documents the pedigree and demographic history of every animal in an Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) managed population among affiliated institutions.

Brooklyn-Based Mulebone Brews Up Relationship Blues on the Wild Rose Moon Radio Hour

Ken Smith

In the sunlight on the other side of the kitchen window, a sly, smile-shaped curve of youthful green caught my eye. I looked closer and saw that this green smile was the right flank of the long rear body segment of a barely stirring praying mantis. At the other end, two antennae swung slowly through space from its triangular head which was topped on the outer edges with those remarkable green bulging eyes. Deep inside each of those green bulges a black spot, sometimes in mesmerizing motion, indicated where the creature was directing its gaze. 

 

Ransomware attacks against healthcare facilities are becoming more frequent and severe as the pandemic and workforce shortages stress hospital capabilities. That makes cyberattacks pose potential life-threatening consequences, experts say.

On Aug. 4, Indianapolis-based Eskenazi Health experienced a ransomware attack, halting access to electronic medical records and requiring ambulances to bypass the city’s safety net hospital.

Who Wants to be a Teacher?

Aug 30, 2021

Monday August 20, 2021

Michiana Chronicles: The Translator's Village

Aug 26, 2021
Emily T. Philips

For Israeli translation scholar Gideon Toury, translation is both an act and an event. It is both a process that requires a wide range of creative, research, interpretive, linguistic, and cultural skills as well as a singular event emerging at a particular moment in time, within specific social and economic contexts. As such, translation, as a process and as an event, contributes to establishing, reinforcing, questioning, or subverting imbalances of power. 

The COVID-19 pandemic has been stressful on everyone, but health care workers may be affected more than anyone. Some nurses are burnt out and planning to leave the profession. Meanwhile, colleges are preparing new graduates to take their place — and deal with the pressures of the job.

Heather Hampson works at John A. Logan College in southern Illinois, helping to train the next generation of nurses.

South Bend Symphony Orchestra Live On WVPE

Aug 25, 2021

This Saturday starting at 7pm you can hear the South Bend Symphony Orchestra live here on WVPE.  You'll hear a full concert featuring dance-themed music from Verdi, Dvorak, Strauss and others.  It's part of the free Community Foundation Performing Arts Series at the Chris Wilson Pavilion at Potawatomi Park. Two musicians from the South Bend Youth Symphony Orchestra will also join in for works by Brahms and Tchaikovsky.  You can bring a lawn chair and see the performance live or simply listen at home Saturday night at 7pm only on WVPE.

APM

Monday, August 23, 2021 at 9 PM

Sid Shroyer

“They moved the entire church brick by brick and only cracked one.” That’s what Lucinda Holderman told me Monday morning on the phone when I was making arrangements to attend the Somerset Lions Club meeting that evening after work. 

Sheila Muhammad tested positive for HIV more than 30 years ago and her life quickly changed. But as the years passed, attitudes and treatments of HIV changed.

Muhammad spoke with Side Effects Public Media's Darian Benson about the power in education and understanding of the virus. A transcript of Muhammad's comments is below.

“My name is Sheila Mohammed I'm 57 years old. I have three children and seven grandchildren and four great.

When you visit one of the Great Lakes, whether it’s a sandy beach or a rocky coastline, it’s hard to imagine how something so big could be affected so profoundly by alien invasive species, or pollution, or climate change. This Environment Report special looks at each of these threats.

Michiana Chronicles: Luke, Lightning And The Antichrist

Aug 12, 2021
Andrew Kreider

My first summer in Michiana, I was part of a group of students who joined a painting business.  Our boss, Luke, a fellow student, was a brilliant entrepreneur who combined possibly excessive thriftiness with student desperation in order to mold a successful enterprise.  It was quite a time.

Photo of the Week: Summertime Wasp

Aug 12, 2021

WVPE listener David Thomas caught our eye this week with a close up photo of a wasp pollinating a flower. He calls the photo "Summertime Wasp."

What are you taking photos of? Email us your shots to photo@wvpe.com and it could be selected as the next WVPE Photo of the Week.

Make sure to include your name, where you live, names of people in the photo, date the photo was taken and the location where the photo was taken. Please send images in .jpg format and scale down any image that is larger than 2 mb in size.

Photo Of The Week: Outdoor Dining

Aug 5, 2021

WVPE listener Elisabeth Simeri caught our eye this week with a photo of a monarch butterfly in her front yard perennial garden. She calls the photo "Outdoor Dining."

What are you taking photos of? Email us your shots to photo@wvpe.com and it could be selected as the next WVPE Photo of the Week.

Make sure to include your name, where you live, names of people in the photo, date the photo was taken and the location where the photo was taken. Please send images in .jpg format and scale down any image that is larger than 2 mb in size.

Brett McNeil

We hit the St. Joe 4-H Fair and did the local bike parade and caught twilight fireworks at the ballpark the night before. The Fourth was a real red-white-and-blue holiday again this year, especially the magnetometers outside the fair. Very Americana.

It was all pretty good fun, especially with a three-year-old, but carried a whiff of the rote and clumsy in our flag-waving and elephant ear-eating, the solemn trotting and urgent smartphone-videotaping of Budweiser Clydesdales. 

Was it a relief to return to a crowd? To celebrate the Fourth in public? 

Sheila Muhammad tested HIV positive in 1990, when she was just 26 years old and pregnant with her third child.

She was shocked, angry and scared. HIV wasn’t something she thought she was at risk for.

“It wasn’t something I was doing,” Muhammad said.

But her husband had tested positive while in treatment for intravenous drug use.

“It took me a long time to know that he was on the drugs,” Muhammad said. “And then I didn't know enough about it. I didn't educate myself to even know that the two went together.”

Photos provided by Kenny Garrett, Bryan Lubeck, Stephen and Mary Merriman

'The Sauce' with host Dawn Burns is back for the program's August installment Monday August 9th at 9:00pm eastern.

Enjoy this one-hour monthly radio broadcast focusing on the arts, music and culture in the Michiana area. Celebrate the vibrant and flavorful melting pot of local and regional talent. The Sauce is produced by Karl Smith (J:Cubed Jazz to the 3rd power). 

https://www.kennygarrett.com

Wild Rose Moon

Monday, August 2, 2021 at 9 PM

Silky smooth harmonies echo forth from 88.1 WVPE as Melissa Carper, Rebecca Patek, and Brennan Leigh hold court on the Wild Rose Moon Radio Hour.  These women are seasoned veterans of the southern music scene and they render the wonderfully nostalgic songs off Melissa’s new album, Daddy’s Country Gold, with effortless grace. 

Heather Curlee-Novak

Friends, I have a confession to make:  I am not just your average stay at home mama.

Photo Of The Week: Robin and Bokeh Roses

Jul 29, 2021

WVPE listener Francis Jeffery stunned us with a close up photo of a robin perched on a railing with roses blooming in the background. He calls the picture "Robin and Bokeh Roses."

What are you taking photos of? Email us your shots to photo@wvpe.com and it could be selected as the next WVPE Photo of the Week.

Make sure to include your name, where you live, names of people in the photo, date the photo was taken and the location where the photo was taken. Please send images in .jpg format and scale down any image that is larger than 2 mb in size.

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