Flint Water Crisis

Michigan Ex-Governor Loses Challenge To Flint Water Charges

Mar 18, 2021
(AP PHOTO/DAVID EGGERT, FILE)

DETROIT (AP) — A judge has rejected a request to dismiss misdemeanor charges against a former Michigan governor in the Flint water scandal. Lawyers for Rick Snyder said he worked in Ingham County, not Genesee County, so the indictment was returned in the wrong place. But Judge William Crawford II says prosecutors have flexibility about where to pursue a case. Snyder's attorneys plan to appeal. The former Republican governor is charged with willful neglect of duty in Flint. The city used the Flint River for drinking water without properly treating it to reduce corrosion.

Attorneys: Ex-Governor Charged In Wrong County Over Flint

Jan 19, 2021
(Genesee County Sheriff's Office via AP)

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Attorneys for former Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder are telling prosecutors that the Flint water case should be dismissed because he was charged in the wrong county. Snyder was charged last week with two misdemeanor counts of willful neglect of duty. The former Republican governor was indicted by a Genesee County judge who sat as a grand juror and considered evidence presented by prosecutors. Snyder lawyer Brian Lennon says in a letter to prosecutors Tuesday the allegations occurred at the governor's office in Lansing.

Ex.-Michigan Gov. Snyder Charged In Flint Water Crisis

Jan 13, 2021
(AP Photo/David Eggert, File)

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Former Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder has been charged with two counts of willful neglect of duty in the Flint water crisis. Residents' tap water became tainted by lead. A legionella outbreak has been connected by experts to ruinous decisions that turned a river into the city's water source in 2014-15. The indictment filed by the attorney general's office is groundbreaking. According to the state archivist, no governor or former governor in Michigan's 184-year history had been charged with crimes related to their time in that office.

 

AP PHOTO/CARLOS OSORIO/FILE

 

AP Photo/Carlos Osorio/File

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court has declined to take a case stemming from the 2014 water crisis in Flint, Michigan.

Approximately 25,000 people have sued over the crisis, in which a change in the source of the city's water resulted in lead contamination.

The case the justices turned away without comment Tuesday involves a lawsuit against the city and water regulators.

The lawsuit claims the officials failed to protect residents from a foreseeable risk of harm.

Jennifer Weingart / WVPE Public Radio

April of next year marks the six-year anniversary of the start of the Flint Water Crisis. That’s significant… because state law gives prosecutors six years to charge public officials for misconduct.

As part of the weekly series MichMash, Jake Neher and Cheyna Roth talk about an effort to extend the statute of limitations in those cases.

Phone Of Ex-Governor Of Michigan Seized In Flint Water Probe

Jun 3, 2019
Courtesy of the Snyder Administration in 2017

 

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Authorities investigating Flint's water crisis have used search warrants to seize from storage the state-owned mobile devices of former Gov. Rick Snyder and 65 other current or former officials, The Associated Press has learned.

 

FLINT, Mich. (AP) — A judge says the federal government can be sued by Flint residents who blame the Environmental Protection Agency for waiting too long to intervene in the city's water crisis.

Federal Judge Linda Parker didn't determine whether EPA employees were negligent when Flint's water system became contaminated with lead in 2014 and 2015. The decision at this stage is more narrow, with the judge saying Thursday that the government isn't immune to a lawsuit.

Brian Charles Watson / Wikimedia Commons

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel is picking up where former Attorney General Bill Schuette left off on three major investigations. They include probes into the Flint Water Crisis… the Larry Nassar sexual abuse scandal… and Catholic priest abuse in Michigan.

As part of the weekly series MichMash… Jake Neher and Cheyna Roth talk about how those investigations are rising above partisan politics.