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The rapidly warming climate is the "greatest threat" to global public health, more than 200 medical journals are warning in an unprecedented joint statement that urges world leaders to cut heat-trapping emissions to avoid "catastrophic harm to health that will be impossible to reverse."

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Divers at the site of an ongoing oil spill that appeared in the Gulf of Mexico after Hurricane Ida have identified the apparent source as one-foot diameter pipeline displaced from a trench on the ocean floor and broken open.

Talos Energy, the Houston-based company currently paying for the cleanup, said in a statement issued Sunday evening that the busted pipeline does not belong to them.

The company said it is working with the U.S. Coast Guard and other state and federal agencies to coordinate the response and identify the owner of the ruptured pipeline.

Divers were working Sunday to locate the source of an oil spill roughly two miles off the coast of Louisiana, in the Bay Marchand area of the Gulf of Mexico, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

Coast Guard spokesperson Lt. John Edwards said Houston-based Talos Energy, an oil and gas company with operations in the Gulf, had hired Clean Gulf Associates as the oil spill response organization for the polluted area in Bay Marchand.

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Scaly and with forked tongues, Komodo dragons are the largest lizards to still walk the Earth.

But their days here may be numbered.

A new report from an international biodiversity conservation organization says the fearsome reptiles are edging closer to global extinction.

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Part 4 of TED Radio Hour episode The Food Connection

How should we ethically feed our world? Are we supposed to return to organic pastoral practices or trust new technology? Journalist Amanda Little believes the answer lies in the middle.

About Amanda Little

Part 3 of TED Radio Hour episode The Food Connection

Social entrepreneur Jasmine Crowe has one mission: feed more, waste less. Her company Goodr is tackling food waste and getting food to those who need it most.

About Jasmine Crowe

Part 2 of TED Radio Hour episode: The Food Connection

The loss of Native American food traditions has been taking place for centuries. At Owamni, chef Sean Sherman is trying to change that by serving food that celebrates and preserves Dakota cooking.

About Sean Sherman

Part 1 of TED Radio Hour episode The Food Connection

Forager and TikTok influencer Alexis Nikole Nelson shares how the great outdoors has offered her both an endless array of food options and an outlet to reconnect with her food and her culture.

About Alexis Nikole Nelson

Sprawling fields of rocks about the size of your fist coat the Pacific seabed. Below miles of ocean, these nodules burst with copper, nickel, manganese and cobalt, all key to building batteries for electric vehicles.

When Mimi Routh got orders to evacuate from the Tahoe Senior Plaza where she lives, she decided not to wait for the city bus like most of her neighbors who were also fleeing the flames of out of control Caldor Fire.

Instead, the 79-year-old Air Force veteran decided to head out on her own. She grabbed a few cherished essentials and drove herself to a shelter in Nevada about twenty miles away.

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While the Gulf Coast and the Northeast struggle with flooding and power outages, it's easy to forget that wildfires are still raging in the West.

Updated September 2, 2021 at 5:54 PM ET

The summer of wild weather continues.

Hurricane Ida's remnants brought catastrophic levels of rain to the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic on Wednesday into Thursday, triggering statewide emergencies as well as the first flash flood emergency issued for New York City.

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Take a look at this video. It shows employees of St. Bernard Parish in Louisiana rescuing a cow trapped on a tree during the floods that swept through the region this week.

Standing in nearly waist-deep water, the crew uses a chainsaw to cut the branches around the cow to free it.

Updated September 1, 2021 at 2:10 PM ET

THE HAGUE, Netherlands — The Biden administration has announced in recent months plans to significantly reduce carbon emissions over the next decade or two, and cut them on a net basis to zero by 2050. Other developed nations have made similar pledges.

Three days after Hurricane Ida blew through Louisiana, high floodwaters are still causing serious issues to recovery efforts in areas closest to the coastline.

Satellite images taken by Maxar on Tuesday shows just how extensive damage is over the Gulf Coast and southern Louisiana. The images are focused on the hard-hit small coastal towns that local officials say received the worst of the storm.

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The U.S. Forest Service is closing every national forest in California, citing the extraordinary risk of wildfires and forecasts that show the threat will only remain high or even get worse. The closures start Tuesday night and run through Sept. 17.

More than 6,800 wildfires have already burned 1.7 million acres of national forest land across California, the Forest Service said, posing a dire threat to people, wildlife and property.

In early May, flames began to spread through a pine forest, consuming a dense carpet of leaves and underbrush. The burn was the definition of a "good fire," intentionally ignited to clear vegetation that could fuel future infernos.

It happened in the state leading the nation in controlled burns: Florida.

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