Indiana News

Indiana related news items and stories.

Consolidated Grain & Barge

 

The CGB plant in southwest Indiana pulls in grain from farmers around the region. It's one of four grain barging companies in the state.

Indiana is fourth nationally for soybean production.

The Painful History Of Eugenics In Wisconsin

Oct 6, 2016

Policies based on eugenics — the notion that humanity can essentially speed up its own evolution by weeding out people with "undesirable" traits — were once widespread in the United States. Eugenics became established as a respectable scientific field in the late 19th century, and had broad support among social and economic leaders, politicians and advocates for women's suffrage. The eugenics movement in the U.S. informed federal immigration restrictions and influenced forced-sterilization laws in at least 30 states.

Ticket info released for governor's debate

Oct 5, 2016

Possibly the hottest ticket in town will be a seat in the theater at the University of Southern Indiana for the October 25th gubernatorial debate.  

The tickets are free but you will need one to get inside the venue. USI officials tell us that the website for tickets to the governor’s debate will go live at 10am central time next Monday. There is a limit of two tickets per person.

The url is: www.usi.edu/debate2016.  Once the tickets are gone, the website will be closed.

Lofts at Former Downtown YMCA

Oct 5, 2016
Samantha Horton

The proposal was tabled, and the city attorney’s office said it plans to work with Anderson to finalize an agreement.

Some things that will need to be considered include parking for the tenants and the layout of the units in the building.

If the project is approved, it’s expected to be completed in 2019.

The Center for Land Use Interpretation

A steelworker was killed at U.S. Steel's Gary Works plant last Friday. It's the second death there this year, and it comes amid rising tensions over safety and staffing at the plant.

Arizona, a traditionally red state, is in play for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton this year.

Sarah Fentem / Indiana Public Broadcasting

On the back stoop of one of the houses, a small group is sitting outside, shooting the breeze next to an overturned pink-and-yellow tricycle.

“Kids just jump on it. It’s just sitting here,” says East Chicago resident Sherry Hunter, who’s wearing a “Calumet Lives Matter” shirt.

Bill Clinton was at a rally in Michigan riffing about the American health care system, riffing being a favorite pastime of the former president. He was getting to a point about how his wife, Hillary Clinton, hopes to improve the Affordable Care Act.

But before he could get there, he described "this crazy system" where under Obamacare millions more people have health coverage but some have seen "their premiums doubled and their coverage cut in half."

Clinton topped it off with a line that rapidly created headline headaches for his wife's campaign.

Little has gone as expected in this extraordinary presidential cycle, so we should have known Tuesday's vice presidential debate would have a twist or two in it, too.

Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence each represented three clients in their 90-minute debate from Farmville, Va. The two former attorneys pleaded the case for their respective principals (Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump), to be sure, but also for their respective parties and for themselves.

The only vice presidential debate between Democrat Tim Kaine and Republican Mike Pence was a bit more heated than expected. For 90 minutes on Tuesday night they sparred on foreign policy, abortion and immigration. But the biggest shadows hanging over them were their running mates.

Indiana Republican Gov. Mike Pence and Virginia Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine met Tuesday evening for the only vice presidential debate of 2016. Many expected the 90-minute face-off at Longwood University in Farmville, Va., to be a cordial affair, and it largely was, but each came armed with plenty of barbs to throw at the other.

Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence will face off tonight to make the case for their running mates, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

NPR’s Ron Elving talks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss what to expect from the debate, and also how Donald Trump’s leaked tax returns continue to reverberate on the campaign trail.

Guest

Amid the clamor of the battle between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, two much lower-key fellows who are also nominees for national office will take the stage Tuesday night in rural Virginia and try to be heard.

Democrat Tim Kaine and Republican Mike Pence will talk about policy and their competing visions for America. They will almost surely offer more substance on issues than we heard in the first debate between the presidential nominees a week earlier.

This evening's face-off between the 2016 vice presidential hopefuls certainly won't have the pizzazz — or inevitable enmity — that last week's debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton had.

A federal appeals court panel Monday blocked Indiana Gov. and Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence's attempt to keep Syrian refugees out of Indiana.

The court upheld a lower court judge in barring Pence from interfering with the distribution of federal funds to resettle Syrian refugees in his state. The appeals court panel said that federal law bars discrimination based on nationality.

Pages