Indianapolis

WFYI News

A street mural reading "Black Lives Matter" in Downtown Indianapolis was defaced over the weekend. On Sunday morning the artwork on Indiana Avenue was covered with splatters of gray paint.

Indy 10 Black Lives Matter organizer Leah Deeray posted a video on Instagram and described the vandalism as an expected response from those against their cause.

"It is still beautiful, we still love it. And yeah, we are going to keep fighting," Deeray said. "This mural did not stop anything. We are going to keep fighting."

(AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Vice President Mike Pence applauded Gov. Eric Holcomb’s efforts Friday to reopen schools this fall, from K-12 to higher education institutions. 

(AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

 

(Indianapolis Fire Department via AP)

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Authorities called in cowboys to wrangle livestock after a trailer carrying 54 cattle overturned on Interstate 65 in downtown Indianapolis.  Battalion Chief Rita Reith (ryt) of the Indianapolis Fire Department says the truck and trailer traveling from Kentucky to Iowa crashed about 5 p.m. Monday, spilling the livestock. She says the cowboys came with fencing to corral the cattle and trailers to transport them from the scene. Reith says six cattle died and one escaped into a nearby neighborhood before being recaptured.

(Lauren Chapman/IPB News)

The U.S. Supreme Court decided this week employees of religious elementary schools cannot sue for discrimination if they get fired, but one lawyer involved in similar cases in Indiana says there are key differences for her clients.

(Evan Robbins/WFYI News)

LGBTQ groups and Democrats at the Statehouse are pushing back against a school policy by the Archdiocese of Indianapolis. The policy bars transgender students from attending schools the Archdiocese oversees

The Children's Museum Of Indianapolis Set To Reopen

Jul 6, 2020
Jill Sheridan/IPB News

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis is opening to the general public later this week for the first time since shutting down in mid-March during the pandemic. While it will open its doors on Saturday, the museum management is putting a variety of measures in place to lower risks of infection. That includes setting visitor capacity at 3,000 and requiring the wearing of masks for everyone older than 2. The museum says it has also stepped up cleaning protocols and improved the circulation of air through the facility in a bid to stem any spread of the novel coronavirus.

Indianapolis Officials Ordering Mandatory Face Masks

Jul 2, 2020

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Face masks will be required in all public places in Indianapolis beginning next week, despite a recent decline in confirmed coronavirus cases in the city. Mayor Joe Hogsett said Thursday that the new mandate takes effect July 9. It requires face coverings in all indoor public spaces unless a person is alone in an office or eating at a restaurant. The Indianapolis mandate follows similar mask requirements by officials in St. Joseph, Elkhart and LaGrange counties in northern Indiana. Gov.

Indianapolis Sued To Stop Use Of Tear Gas In Protests

Jun 18, 2020
Lauren Chapman/IPB News

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Protesters who were met with tear gas and other weapons by the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department while demonstrating against police brutality sued the city Thursday to halt the use of the chemical agents and projectiles. The federal lawsuit was filed on behalf of Indy10 Black Lives Matter and individual protesters by the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana. It argues that the use of chemical agents and projectiles for crowd control violates the First Amendment.

(Brock Turner, WFIU/WTIU News)

Stay at home orders and bans for non-essential travel have kept people in their homes and grounded business travel. While experts say there is little doubt those safeguards have saved lives, the effects have been devastating for airlines.

And those like Tim Simpson, a Senior Maintenance Manager at Republic Airways, who's spent decades in hangers at the Indianapolis International Airport says aircraft can be heard taking off and landing every five minutes or so on a normal day. This time is far from normal.

Airfield Silence Makes Workers Sick

Justin Hicks, Indiana Public Broadcasting

Systemic racism has a huge impact on the health of African-Americans in the U.S. It's literally a problem from cradle to grave, affecting everything from infant mortality to life expectancy. And now, COVID-19 is taking a disproportionate toll on the community. Here's a sampling of Side Effects  stories highlighting the health care divide — and potential solutions.

(Simon Property Group)

Indianapolis-based Simon Property Group is suing one of its largest tenants for unpaid rent during the coronavirus pandemic. The lawsuit highlights just one of the company’s recent moves due to COVID-19.

The lawsuit filed by Simon in Delaware state court claims The Gap failed to pay nearly $66 million in rent and other charges during months when the retailer was closed.

Indiana University Kelley School of Business Center for Education and Research in Retail director John Talbott says it sends a message that Simon will hold tenants to their lease obligations.

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indianapolis will wait another week before following state’s lead in lifting more coronavirus restrictions on businesses. The mayor says the city will keep current limits in place until June 19, while a new statewide order from Gov. Eric Holcomb that takes effect Friday will allow movie theaters and bars to reopen and greater number of customers at restaurants and retail stores. Indianapolis has been easing restrictions more slowly than most of the rest of the state, citing a higher concentration of COVID-19 infections and the city’s greater population density.

Indiana Confederate Monument Being Dismantled

Jun 8, 2020
(AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Crews in Indianapolis are dismantling a monument that's dedicated to Confederate soldiers who died at a Union prison camp in the city. Workers started taking the monument down Monday morning. Mayor Joe Hogsett announced last week that the monument would be removed from Garfield Park. It was commissioned in 1912 for Greenlawn Cemetery to commemorate Confederate prisoners of war who died while imprisoned at Camp Morton in Indianapolis.

Mom Of Indiana Black Man Killed By Police Asks Feds To Help

Jun 3, 2020
(AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The family of a black man who was fatally shot by an Indianapolis police officer are calling for the federal government to intervene and conduct its own probe of his death. Swaray Conteh, an attorney for the family of 21-year-old Dreasjon "Sean" Reed, said during a Wednesday news conference that they are seeking federal involvement to investigate Reed's fatal May 6 shooting by an officer during a foot chase so that a thorough, transparent investigation is conducted into his death.

Justin Hicks/IPB News

Black Lives Matter protests continued in Indianapolis for the fifth night Tuesday and ended peacefully without police confrontation, despite many protesters marching well past a 9 p.m. curfew.

From mid-afternoon until about 10 p.m., two peaceful demonstrations started at Monument Circle and wound around downtown. Protesters and police encountered each other on the steps of the Statehouse, but there was no violence on either side. As protesters continued to march past the curfew, police waited at intersections, but purposefully did not block or arrest protesters.

(Lauren Chapman/IPB News)

Gov. Eric Holcomb says he’ll continue to work on his “to-do list” for addressing systemic racism and injustice in Indiana.

Holcomb Monday spoke about this past weekend’s protests over racial injustice and police brutality, particularly against black Americans.

He did not directly address the latter issue – he only praised what he calls “restraint” shown by law enforcement. There were multiple reports of police in Indiana using tear gas on peaceful protesters, before demonstrations became violent.

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

Downtown Indianapolis streets were quiet Sunday night as a county-wide curfew kept people at home.

News reports showed empty streets in the heart of downtown as the clock approached midnight,  but about six hours earlier it appeared the city might be heading into a third night of unrest.

Indianapolis police used tear gas to disperse groups of protestors well ahead of the curfew that was set to begin at 8 p.m.

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Indianapolis mayor ordered an overnight curfew after two nights of violent protests over the Minneapolis death of George Floyd led to several shootings and widespread downtown damage. The governor announced that Indiana National Guard members were on standby to assist any cities with violence, although Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett said he wasn't seeking such action. Several hundred people took part in a peaceful protest Sunday in downtown Indianapolis.

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

Police say two people are dead following shootings that occurred late Saturday night amid violent protests in downtown Indianapolis.

The deadly shootings happened at Market and Talbot streets and 10 E. Market St. Two people were also shot in the area of Alabama and New York streets, according to IMPD. Their condition was unknown.

Eric Weddle/WFYI

A gathering of a few hundred people in downtown Indianapolis Friday that stretched from the afternoon until night ended in police officers releasing tear gas and shooting rubber bullets at the crowds. 

That set off hours of chaos downtown that stretched into early Saturday when a CVS drug store was set on fire

The protest, like others around the country, follows the death of George Floyd while in he was Minneapolis police custody.

ISDH

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — State health officials say 21 more Hoosiers have died from COVID-19 while another 370 people have been diagnosed with the respiratory disease caused by the coronavirus. The 18 additional confirmed deaths reported Wednesday by the Indiana State Department of Health occurred between May 20 and Tuesday, bringing the number of Hoosiers confirmed to have died from COVID-19 to 1,871. Another 159 people have died from probable infections of COVID-19, raising Indiana’s confirmed or presumed deaths to 2,030 since the state recorded its first death on March 15.

(FILE PHOTO: Samantha Horton/IPB News)

Downtown Indianapolis will go this summer without the thousands of game enthusiasts who attend Gen Con. On Tuesday, the tabletop game convention announced it was canceling the in-person event in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

(Pixabay)

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indianapolis International Airport’s top official says it could take up to three years for the airport’s flights to bounce back to the levels it saw before the coronavirus pandemic. Airport authority executive director Marion Rodriguez says the airport’s flight activity has dropped to as low as 5% of typical operations since the virus outbreak spread across the U.S. in March, and it recently served only 14 of its 53 destinations. Rodriguez says the airport could have 45% fewer flights than originally expected for the year.

FILE PHOTO: Doug Jaggers/WFYI

The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department says a police chase Wednesday ended in a fatal officer-involved shooting.  IMPD provided updates on the incident at a press conference Thursday. 

Police say Dreasjon Reed was driving erratically when police started pursuing the vehicle he was driving. Reed streamed the chase live on Facebook while thousands of people watched. 

BREAKING NEWS: Big Ten Men's Basketball Tourney Canceled

Mar 12, 2020
AP Photo/Michael Conroy

Several college basketball conference tournaments have been canceled moments before tipoff, putting the NCAA Tournament at risk.

The Big Ten, Big 12 and the SEC tournaments announced they were off, and other conferences were expected to follow suit.

The men's NCAA Tournament is one of the most popular events on the American sports calendar. March Madness draws hundreds of thousands of fans to arenas from coast to coast.

Indiana Bill Further Restricts Panhandling

Mar 12, 2020
FILE PHOTO: Doug Jaggers/WFYI

A bill that further criminalizes panhandling awaits the governor’s signature. 

Both Indiana chambers passed the bill that would make it a misdemeanor to ask for money within 50 feet of any place where financial transactions are made, including parking meters. That effectively bans panhandling in downtown Indianapolis.

Supporters of the bill say aggressive panhandling is the biggest complaint they hear about Indianapolis from visitors. 

The new law could face legal challenges. The Indiana ACLU says the measure is unconstitutional. 

Only Essential Staff And Limited Family At NCAA Tournaments

Mar 11, 2020
AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File

The NCAA is closing games to fans during the upcoming men’s and women’s Division One basketball play-offs over concerns about the coronavirus.

March Madness is one of the organization’s most profitable sporting events.

In a statement, President Mark Emmert says the decision comes after careful thought on what would be best for the public, including fans, coaches and student-athletes.

Emmert says, “We recognize the opportunity to compete in an NCAA national championship is an experience of a lifetime for the students and their families.”

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Prosecutors say a northern Indiana man has been charged in the 2000 killing of a man found dead in an Indianapolis hotel room after his DNA matched DNA found beneath the victim’s fingernails.

Fifty-four-year-old William O. Swain of Elkhart was charged last week with murder, felony murder and criminal deviate conduct in the October 2000 killing of 38-year-old Arthur McPhaul.

After he was found fatally strangled in a hotel room, investigators retrieved DNA from under McPhaul’s fingernails, but were unable to find a match.

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

Fewer people are traveling due to restrictions and concerns over the spread of the coronavirus. Tourism officials in the state say they’re watching the situation closely.

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