Michigan News

Two MSU students are working to bring notable landmarks from around the world into the classroom with virtual reality technology.

Tommy Truong and Eric Martin have developed 360-degree immersive environments of sites like the Colosseum in Rome and the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. to be used in tandem with traditional teaching methods.

Truong believes immersive VR experiences can be a valuable and inexpensive way for educators to engage their students.

Members of Michigan's congressional delegation have sent letters to the Trump administration and the Canadian government in hopes of stopping a planned nuclear waste site along Lake Huron.

Ontario Power Generation wants to store low and intermediate level radioactive waste less than a mile from Lake Huron.  The utility insists the plan is safe and other options are too expensive.

The Canadian government is taking public comment on the proposal.    

Governor Rick Snyder says he’s trying to learn more about President Trump’s executive order on immigration. But he says it’s the start of a national discussion on the subject. Snyder says he is reaching to other governors and the Trump administration to better understand the order and its effects.

  

The governor released a statement this morning while he is overseas on a trip to Israel.

  

Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley is in charge while the governor’s away. He says criticism of the order is overblown.

President Trump's executive order on immigration was signed last Friday.

Here's what it does:

Will grass carp spread in the Great Lakes?

Jan 31, 2017

There are grass carp in three of the Great Lakes, but it’s not too late to do something about it.

That’s one of the conclusions of a new risk assessment on this type of Asian carp by the United States and Canada.

A study from the University of Michigan suggests engaging at-risk youth is a key tactic for understanding and preventing terrorism. 

The study was led by U-M Research scientist Scott Atran and co-authored by professor of public policy Robert Axelrod.

According to the study, young adults often join extremist groups like ISIS because they are socially connected to others who have done the same. They say this is a response to being unable to organize in creative, nonviolent ways.

About a thousand people marched in Betsy DeVos’ hometown Saturday afternoon, to protest her nomination as U.S. Education Secretary.

“I was expecting maybe 500 people,” Cadence Morton of Caledonia says of Saturday’s march in Holland. She helped publicize the rally, which began as a private facebook event among friends.

For more than an hour protestors with handmade signs wrapped around the perimeter of Centennial Park; about the size of a football field in downtown Holland.

“That is just incredible," Morton says. "I’m floored by that."

Thousands of protesters gathered yesterday at Detroit Metro Airport and in Dearborn, Hamtramck, Grand Rapids and Ann Arbor to demonstrate against President Donald Trump’s ban on immigrants from seven majority Muslim countries.

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There’s a split emerging between Governor Rick Snyder and Republican leaders in the Legislature over cutting taxes.

Governor Snyder will present a budget next week for the coming fiscal year. Some Republican leaders in the Legislature are pushing for tax cuts. That includes an income tax rollback and some lawmakers are taking aim at the tax on pensions.

Snyder is pushing back. The pension tax was one of his first budget reforms after he took office in 2011. Snyder says that was only fair to people who were paying taxes on 401 (k) and other retirement plans.

A U.S. Senate committee votes tomorrow on the nomination of west Michigan billionaire Betsy DeVos as the next U.S. Secretary of Education.

Michigan groups for and against the controversial nomination were busy over the weekend lobbying before the vote.

Gary Naeyaert is the executive director of the Great Lakes Education Project, which was founded by Betsy DeVos.

An Iraqi man planned to come join his wife and child in Michigan later this year. They’d been issued special visas because of his wife’s work as an interpreter for the U.S. military in Iraq. But when word started getting out last week about a looming crackdown on immigration, he changed his plans. By Wednesday, he was doing everything he could to get out of Iraq immediately.

Michigan’s passenger rail system doesn’t seem to generate a lot of enthusiasm.

We received this anonymous question on our M-I Curious page: “Why doesn't Michigan have a good passenger train system?”

The question simply begged for clarification, such as, “Who says?” and, “What would you consider good?”

Although the question got a lot of votes, we never heard from "Anonymous" again. 

So we went to the Amtrak station in Ann Arbor to see what we could see.

The train is late, but the train is still great

An initiative to bring jobs back to the United States was announced in Detroit today.

Debbie Stabenow has been pushing her "Bring Jobs Home Act" in the U.S. Senate since 2012.

Senator Stabenow said the bill would get rid of tax loopholes for companies that outsource jobs, and reward those moving jobs back.

Stabenow said every time companies take jobs from the U.S., American taxpayers pay for the move.

“You want to move away from the United States, you are on your own,” Stabenow said. “We aren’t paying for it.”

There is no evidence of any widespread election fraud during the state’s 2016 presidential election, according to a forensic analysis released Monday by the Anderson Economic Group.

Anderson Economic Group CEO Patrick Anderson says they looked into two claims.

United States Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor called for greater diversity on college campuses while speaking at the University of Michigan Monday.

“We are making improvements toward that kind of equality,” said Sotomayor. “But we are still far from it. When you look at the number of African Americans at the University of Michigan, there’s a real problem there.”

Justice Susanne Baer of the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany joined Sotomayor in the forum moderated by NPR’s Michelle Norris.

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