utilities

(Lauren Chapman/IPB News)

The Indiana State Department of Health reported 21 additional confirmed deaths since Sunday, bringing the state’s total to 2,448. The state announced more than 45,000 total confirmed cases, with more than 484,000 Hoosiers tested.

(Rebecca Thiele/IPB News)

Many Hoosiers who are unable to pay their energy bills won’t face shutoffs for another 45 days. On Monday, the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission ordered some utilities to continue the moratorium on shutoffs through Aug. 14. 

(Courtesy of the State of Indiana)

Hoosiers whose jobs were affected by COVID-19 could get access to some help with utility costs.

(Lauren Chapman/IPB News)

The Indiana State Department of Health reported 37 additional confirmed deaths Thursday, bringing the state’s total to 1,907. The state announced more than 33,000 total confirmed cases, with more than 242,000 Hoosiers tested.

(Ildar Sagdejev/Wikimedia Commons)

The state plans to look into how the pandemic has affected Indiana utilities and their customers. This comes just days after Gov. Eric Holcomb extended the moratorium on utility disconnections for unpaid bills by another month. 

(Rebecca Thiele/IPB News)

Utility companies will soon be allowed to resume disconnections for unpaid bills. The state’s consumer advocate group is asking the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission to continue protections for people unemployed due to the COVID-19 crisis. 

ATTA KENARE/AFP via Getty Images

Several cities and companies have suspended utility shut offs during the coronavirus pandemic. It could help families on the margin.

Legislation that could have put a moratorium on some new power plants in Indiana was overturned Thursday. The House passed an amendment to remove that language from a bill dealing with various utility matters.

Brandon Smith

Republicans in a House committee this week voted to largely halt new power plants in Indiana for the next two years.

The moratorium’s architect says he wants to ensure the state’s energy future is balanced.

A new study shows hate crimes laws often aren’t utilized. House lawmakers change a school bus safety bill. And a Senate panel advances a bill to loosen restrictions on adoption advertising.

Here’s what you might have missed this week at the Statehouse.

Hate Crimes Research

A controversial bill moving through the state Senate would make changes to a law that lets utilities more quickly recover the costs of certain projects from ratepayers. It involves the Transmission, Distribution, and Storage Improvement Charge or TDSIC. 

NIPSCO requests gas rate hike

Nov 28, 2017
stock photo

 

The Northern Indiana Public Service Company, or NIPSCO, is requesting a rate hike that would increase customers gas rates by about $10 a month.

The rate hike is $8.50 on the base rate and 6.6 cents per therm.

NIPSCO spokesperson Nick Meyer says the rate hike will allow them to pay for maintenance and several major system upgrades.

A bill approved Wednesday in a House committee would allow utilities to charge future alternative energy customers a fee.