water

Photo Of The Week - Sunrise Reflection

Aug 13, 2020
Tamisyn Grantz

WVPE's latest Photo of the Week comes from South Bend as the sun was rising and being reflected on the water. Thanks to Tamisyn Grantz of South Bend for capturing this image. Tamisyn took the photo on Monday, Aug 3rd on the south side of South Bend. 

We'd love to see what you are taking pictures of. Email them to us at wvpe@wvpe.org. 

Make sure to include your name, where you live, names of people in the photo, date the photo was taken and the location where the photo was taken. 

(Eric Schmuttenmaer/Wikimedia Commons)

The central Indiana region will need to withdraw almost 30 percent more water 50 years from now than it does today. That’s according to the first of several reports from the Indiana Finance Authority on the region’s water needs. 

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

The Indiana State Department of Health reported 37 additional deaths on Tuesday, bringing the state’s total to 387. The state announced more than 8,500 total confirmed cases, with more than 46,000 Hoosiers tested.

In response to outbreaks at long-term care facilities, State Health Commissioner Kris Box authorized nursing homes and retirement communities to transfer, discharge or relocate residents. In a statement, she said this will allow facilities to establish COVID-dedicated units to protect people who have not tested positive for the virus, and care for those who have. 

Courtesy of Purdue University

The COVID-19 pandemic could threaten drinking water safety in buildings that have been closed. Purdue University is working quickly with other research teams across the country to develop guidance for when places like offices, schools, and gyms reopen. 

Water left to sit in pipes can get contaminated with toxic heavy metals and bacteria — like the kind that causes Legionnaires’ disease, another illness that affects the lungs. 

Rebecca Thiele/IPB News

Climate change is expected to threaten Indiana’s water supply. Indiana University’s Environmental Resilience Institute has developed an interactive map to help cities plan for less clean water in the future. 

The mapping tool lets people see how much water cities in the Wabash River basin are projected to lose or gain in the next 30 or 60 years.

Courtesy of IDEM

A seemingly simple bill to help local governments cut costs when repairing drains is working its way through the state legislature. But environmentalists worry it could harm the state’s wetlands. 

The bill proposed by Sen. Victoria Spartz (R-Noblesville) would allow local governments to fix or reconstruct a drain in a state wetland without a permit from the Indiana Department of Environmental Management.

FILE PHOTO: Peter Balonon-Rosen/IPB News

A bill that would require schools to test for lead in drinking water passed the state House on Thursday. The measure was originally aimed at Lake County schools, but it was recently amended by Rep. Sue Errington (D-Muncie) to include all Indiana schools. 

Kids who get exposed to lead can have trouble learning, behavioral issues, and poor kidney function. The bill would require all schools that haven’t tested for lead at least once since 2016 to do so within the next two years.

Galina Ovtcharova & Alexei Ovtcharov/Fotki

U.S. Steel’s northwest Indiana facility had its fourth spill this year into a Lake Michigan waterway. The company reported the release to the Indiana Department of Environmental Management on Wednesday night, the same day the government and U.S. Steel posted their revised consent decree

Galina Ovtcharova & Alexei Ovtcharov/Fotki

U.S. Steel had yet another oil leak on Friday. An official with the northwest Indiana company says it found a “light, intermittent oil sheen” near one of its pipes that discharges into Lake Michigan waterways. 

This comes just weeks after another leak from U.S. Steel and a chemical spill from ArcelorMittal that killed 3,000 fish. Residents and environmentalists are hoping this won’t become “the new normal.” 

Midwest environmental groups are threatening to sue the Environmental Protection Agency for delaying action on polluted rivers and streams in Indiana.

The Environmental Law & Policy Center, the Alliance for the Great Lakes, and the Hoosier Environmental Council sent a letter Wednesday giving the EPA 60 days notice of their lawsuit.