Sasha Ingber

Sasha Ingber is a reporter on NPR's breaking news desk, where she covers national and international affairs of the day.

She got her start at NPR as a regular contributor to Goats and Soda, reporting on terrorist attacks of aid organizations in Afghanistan, the man-made cholera epidemic in Yemen, poverty in the United States, and other human rights and global health stories.

Before joining NPR, she contributed numerous news articles and short-form, digital documentaries to National Geographic, covering an array of topics that included the controversy over undocumented children in the United States, ISIS' genocide of minorities in Iraq, wildlife trafficking, climate change, and the spatial memory of slime.

She was the editor of a U.S. Department of State team that monitored and debunked Russian disinformation following the annexation of Crimea in 2014. She was also the associate editor of a Smithsonian culture magazine, Journeys.

In 2016, she co-founded Music in Exile, a nonprofit organization that documents the songs and stories of people who have been displaced by war, oppression, and regional instability. Starting in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, she interviewed, photographed, and recorded refugees who fled war-torn Syria and religious minorities who were internally displaced in Iraq. The work has led Sasha to appear live on-air for radio stations as well as on pre-recorded broadcasts, including PRI's The World.

As a multimedia journalist, her articles and photographs have appeared in additional publications including The Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, and The Willamette Week.

Before starting a career in journalism, she investigated the international tiger trade for The World Bank's Global Tiger Initiative, researched healthcare fraud for the National Healthcare Anti-Fraud Association, and taught dance at a high school in Washington, D.C.

A Pulitzer Center grantee, she holds a master's degree in nonfiction writing from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor's degree in film, television, and radio from the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

ISIS has released a new audio recording that purportedly features its reclusive leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. If confirmed to be his voice, it would be his first recording to emerge in nearly a year.

Mexico's second-largest city has passed a measure to decriminalize sexual relations in public — a tactic meant to shift the attention of police toward serious crime.

In a statement issued last week that begins "We take human rights seriously," the government of Guadalajara said having consensual sexual relations or engaging in acts of a sexual nature in public places, such as in cars or parks, would only be prosecuted if there is a complaint.

Most of the world knows her as a survivor of ISIS brutality, but Nadia Murad, who has tried to loosen shackles of the past, recently announced her plans to be married. Her engagement comes at a time when members of her Yazidi community, an ancient religious minority, face an uncertain future in northern Iraq.

In August 2014, Murad was one of thousands of Yazidis who were captured by ISIS and forced into sexual slavery. Three months later, she escaped through the door that one of her captors left unlocked.

Taiwan lost another ally on Tuesday after El Salvador's president, Salvador Sanchez Ceren, reversed course on his country's diplomatic direction by establishing ties with Beijing. The move isolates the democratic island at a time when China has tried to weaken it on the world stage.

Since the late 1940s, China has regarded Taiwan as a renegade province and has pressured countries and businesses to recognize the self-ruled island not as a sovereign nation but as a Chinese territory.

At a pier in San Diego, researchers on Wednesday recorded the warmest sea surface temperature since record-keeping began there in 1916.

Every day, researchers from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego collect data — by hand — from the Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier.

The Treasury Department slapped sanctions on a Russian bank on Friday, accusing it of processing transactions for North Korea in violation of United Nations sanctions.

Agrosoyuz Commercial Bank knowingly facilitated "a significant transaction" on behalf of a person affiliated with North Korea's weapons of mass destruction, the agency said in a statement.

The individual was named as Han Jang Su, the Moscow-based chief representative of North Korea's primary foreign exchange bank, the Foreign Trade Bank.

Three Russian journalists were killed on Monday night in the Central African Republic as they were investigating a private military company with ties to the Kremlin.

Acclaimed war correspondent Orkhan Dzhemal, documentary filmmaker Alexander Rastorguyev and cameraman Kirill Radchenko traveled to the country to make a documentary for a news website funded by Mikhail Khodorkovsky, an oil tycoon who was imprisoned in Russia and then exiled.

Just minutes after Caucher Birkar was given a golden Fields Medal at a ceremony Wednesday in Rio de Janeiro, it vanished.

Birkar, a Kurd who fled Iran and became a Cambridge University professor, was one of four people to win the award.

"I really want to help people in less privileged locations, countries. ... Especially in the case of Kurds," he said in receiving the award. "And I'm hoping that this news would maybe put a little smile on the lips of these 40 million people."

New York's former state Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, once a powerful decision-maker in Albany, was handed a seven-year prison sentence on Friday.

It is the second time that Silver, a 74-year-old Democrat, has been found guilty of taking nearly $4 million in bribes and gaining another $1 million through money laundering.

Sombra is a 6-year-old German shepherd who has been on Colombia's counter-narcotics police force since she was a puppy. And she is so good at her job that drug dealers want her dead.

Sombra, Spanish for "shadow," was trained to sniff out drugs and has uncovered so many stashes of cocaine that one of the country's most powerful criminal organizations has put a price on her head.

Facial recognition software sold by Amazon mistakenly identified 28 members of Congress as people who had been arrested for crimes, the American Civil Liberties Union announced on Thursday.

Amazon Rekognition has been marketed as tool that provides extremely accurate facial analysis through photos and video.

The ACLU tested that assertion by using the software to scan photos of every current member of the House and Senate in a database that the watchdog built from thousands of publicly available arrest photos.

His name was Scott Michael Johnson, and he was 26 years old when a plane flew into the World Trade Center tower he worked in on Sept. 11, 2001.

His remains have now been identified, nearly 17 years later after the attack.

New York City's Office of Chief Medical Examiner announced the news on Wednesday.

A New York liquor heiress was arrested on Tuesday as part of an ongoing investigation into a group accused of coercing women into sex.

Clare Bronfman, 39, is an heiress to the Seagram's liquor fortune. She is also an executive board member of NXIVM (pronounced Nex-ee-um).

Despite billing itself as a community "guided by humanitarian principles," the organization had a secret group that recruited and enslaved female followers under the pretense of mentorship, prosecutors contended.

Wednesday's election in Pakistan marks the second time in the country's 71-year history that power will be passed from one civilian government to another. But the weeks leading to the vote have been marred by extreme violence. Activists, journalists and candidates say the campaign was tainted, throwing a fragile democratic process into question.

De Beers Group, the company most known for diamonds, announced Monday that it is moving 200 elephants from South Africa to Mozambique in an attempt to boost that country's depleted population.

In July and August, some 60 elephants are scheduled make the trip from the company's Venetia Limpopo Nature Reserve, in the northernmost part of South Africa, to Zinave National Park in central Mozambique.

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