Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

We all know "password" is no good, and "1234567" is asking for trouble.

But the more we try to strengthen our passwords, the harder we make them to remember.

It's a thoroughly modern problem — but researchers at the University of Southern California have found a very old solution. Instead of passwords, consider the passpoem:

The tiny villagers explore
a speaker company rapport

Updated at 4:10 a.m. ET

Imprisoned American journalist Jason Rezaian has been convicted, according to an Iranian Judiciary spokesman who appeared on state TV Sunday night. The spokesman did not say on which charges Rezaian had been convicted or whether a sentence had been imposed.

It's the latest development in a case that's been marked by secrecy and uncertainty. Rezaian, The Washington Post's Tehran bureau chief, was arrested in Tehran in 2014 and accused of espionage, a charge the Post denies.

You probably won't be one of the few souls to meet Pope Francis on his visit to the U.S. next week. But hey, it could happen, and if it does, don't you want to be ready?

Here's a primer on what you need to know so, at the very least, you'll be well-prepared for small talk about him, if not to him.

Etiquette

The pope is never introduced. He literally is a man who needs no introduction. (You, of course, ought to be introduced by somebody.)

Flavia Pennetta has defeated Roberta Vinci to win the U.S. Open, in a women's final that was an all-Italian affair.

The two women have more in common than their nationality. They were opponents and doubles partners as kids, the Associated Press reports. It was the first major final for both. And they were both outperforming expectations just by being there: Vinci was unseeded, and Pennetta was the 26th seed.

Updated at 11:50 p.m. EDT

Mei Xiang, the female giant panda at the Washington National Zoo, gave birth to two live cubs on Saturday.

The first cub was born in the afternoon, and the second cub emerged 4 1/2 hours later. Both appear to be healthy, the zoo reports.

Jason Day earned his first major title at the PGA Championship today, beating out Jordan Spieth by three shots — and becoming the first player to ever finish at 20 under par in a major.

At Whistling Straits on Sunday, Day finished at 268. At 20 under, that score edges out the previous major record of 19 under par, set by Tiger Woods at St. Andrews in 2000.

Earlier in the major season, Day had twice risen to the head of the pack, The Associated Press reports; He briefly tied for the lead at both the U.S. Open (where he was battling vertigo) and the British Open.

Typos are embarrassing in emails, dangerous in cover letters, cringe-inducing when they're on social media.

But it could always be worse: That mistake could be inked into your skin.

This September, a few unlucky Colombians will be freed from that plight. An institute dedicated to studying and teaching the Spanish language is offering to fix tattooed typos forever — free.

A grand jury has indicted Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton on three counts of securities fraud, according to multiple media reports.

Paxton is accused of misleading investors in a technology company — by encouraging investments without revealing he was making a commission on them — and, on a lesser charge, of failing to register as a solicitor while he was referring clients to an investment firm, the New York Times reports.

Federal regulators are fining Fiat Chrysler $105 million for failing to acknowledge and address safety defects in a timely fashion.

The civil penalty — the largest ever imposed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration — will be accompanied by three years of "unprecedented" federal oversight, the agency says. Fiat Chrysler has also agreed to buy back some vehicles from their owners.

The U.S. team won the Women's World Cup soccer final 5-2 in a game that brought U.S. fans to their feet, reduced polished sportswriters to all-caps expressions of awe and rewrote FIFA records — and that was just in the first half.

The game began in spectacular fashion: In the first five minutes, captain Carli Lloyd scored two swift goals — the fastest two goals in FIFA history, according to the FIFA Women's World Cup Twitter account.

Just a few minutes later, Lauren Holiday brought the score up to 3-0.

Nearly 500 people were injured at a water park in Taiwan after an explosion at a music event caused a fire to break out Saturday night.

The fire started during an evening rap performance in New Taipei City, NPR's Frank Langfitt, reporting from Shanghai, tells our Newscast unit. The accident at Formosa Fun Coast was caught on cellphone video.

"At one point, green powder shot out from the stage over the audience," Frank says. "The powder quickly ignited, enveloping fans. Some people staggered around on fire, while others collapsed to the ground."

Updated at 8:50 p.m. EDT

U.S. airstrikes in Libya have killed Algerian militant Mokhtar Belmokhtar, who led the 2013 attack on an Algerian gas plant that killed at least 38 foreign hostages.

Two Pentagon officials confirm that U.S. airstrikes killed Belmokhtar. The Libyan government also released a statement confirming his death.

It took nearly four decades, but a horse has once again attained the honor that some call the most difficult achievement in sports: American Pharoah, after winning the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes, ran to victory in the Belmont Stakes as well.

He's the first Triple Crown winner since 1978. With his win, a total of 12 horses have now achieved the feat.

American Pharoah took the lead early in the mile-and-a-half long race, with Frosted close on his tail. From there, the colt never gave up the front position.

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has broken his leg in a bike crash outside of Geneva, the State Department has confirmed.

"Secretary Kerry broke his right femur in a bicycling accident this morning in Scionzier, France," State Department spokesman John Kirby says.

Updated at 7 p.m. EDT

Amtrak will be restoring rail service between Philadelphia and New York at 5:30 Monday morning, the rail service announced Sunday.

Service between the two cities had been shut down since Tuesday, when train 188 derailed in Philadelphia, killing eight and wounding more than 200.

The affected section of track is part of the Northeast Corridor — the busiest railroad in America.

American Pharoah is the king of the nation's horse races this month: in a driving rain, the Kentucky Derby winner took home top prize at the Preakness Stakes Saturday.

Ridden by Victor Espinoza, he left the other horses at Pimlico Race Course eating his mud; with an unofficial time of 1:58.46, he led by an impressive seven lengths.

If he can win the Belmont Stakes on June 6, he'll be the first Triple Crown winner since 1978.

American Pharoah, ridden by Victor Espinoza, has won the 141st Kentucky Derby with a time of 2:03:02.

He raced to victory before the largest Derby crowd ever — 170,513, reports The Associated Press.

American Pharoah, owned by Ahmed Zayat, was the favorite heading into the race at Churchill Downs in Louisville. He had to fight Firing Line and Dortmund for the victory; the three were neck-and-neck (and neck) for a stretch, but American Pharoah pulled ahead at the end. Firing Line came in second.

Jordan Spieth, 21, has won the Masters with a record-tying score, 18 under par.

Spieth led from the first round of the tournament in Augusta, Ga. — a feat last achieved by Raymond Floyd in 1976.

On Sunday, reports the AP, no other contender truly threatened Spieth's dominance:

No one got closer than three shots of the lead all day. Spieth shot a 2-under 70 to hold off Justin Rose and Phil Mickelson.

Rose, the 2013 U.S. Open champion playing in the final group of the major for the first time, and Mickelson were four shots back.

March Madness has begun: The NCAA has announced the seeds for the 2015 men's basketball tournament.

As expected, Kentucky is seeded first in the Midwest Region, and is also the top seed overall. If the thus-far undefeated team wins the tournament, they'll be the first undefeated men's basketball team in nearly four decades.

In the East, Villanova won the top spot; in the South, that went to Duke, and in the West, Wisconsin was seeded No. 1.

For sale: lovingly handcrafted shares of Etsy stock, proudly produced in the USA by a team of entrepreneurs, designers and coders. Please note, there may be some variation in size, color and profits.

A decade ago, Etsy launched as a way for crafters and DIY-ers to sell their handmade goods online. Now the New York-based e-commerce site has filed for an initial public offering.

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) took home the best picture award at the 87th annual Academy Awards; the film also earned director Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárittu the Oscar for directing.

Julianne Moore won best actress for her work in Still Alice, and Eddie Redmayne won best actor for his role as Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything.

Other notable wins:

Big Hero 6 won for best animated feature film.

President Obama's State of the Union address on Tuesday will call for higher taxes on wealthy Americans and tax credits for the middle class, The Associated Press reports, citing anonymous senior administration officials.

The proposed tax changes will include raising the capital gains rate on couples making over half a million dollars a year from 23.8 to 28 percent, the wire service continues, and requiring estates to pay capital gains tax on inherited securities.

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

Ships and planes have resumed the search for AirAsia flight QZ8501, which lost contact with air traffic control on Sunday. The search efforts, which were suspended overnight, picked up again at dawn, The Associated Press reports.

Bambang Soelistyo, the head of Indonesia's search and rescue agency, says the plane has likely crashed into the ocean, Reuters reports. Soelistyo calls that an "initial estimation."

Update at 8:30 p.m. ET

Two New York police officers were ambushed and fatally shot while sitting in their patrol car in Brooklyn's Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood Saturday. The suspected gunman has died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

When it comes to the perfect holiday sweater, for many people, cheesy is good — tacky is better — and astonishingly ugly is best of all.

The demand for ugly holiday sweaters has reached such a height that it's changed how businesses stock for the season, as Eleanor Klibanoff reported for us on Weekend Edition Saturday. Wal-Mart and Kohl's sell new "vintage" ugly sweaters, and actual vintage stores have had to start searching for new stock to sell.

Update at 1:33 a.m. ET

An undisclosed number of hostages are being held at a chocolate shop and cafe in Sydney, Australia. Reuters is reporting that police say they've made contact with the gunman and that TV footage showed three then two more people running from the scene. The number of hostages is said to be "not as high as 30," according to New South Wales Deputy Police Commissioner Catherine Burn.

Risen, who shared a Pulitzer Prize for revealing the scope of the NSA's warrentless wiretapping program in 2005, refused, and risked jail as a result.

In June, however, Holder insisted that Risen wouldn't face jail time, saying, "As long as I'm attorney general, no reporter who is doing his job is going to go to jail."

Remains of one of the 43 missing college students in Mexico have been identified, NPR's Mexico correspondent Carrie Kahn reports for our Newscast division.

DNA tests showed that bone fragments matched a student identified as Alexander Mora Venancio, 19, one of the students who went missing in September, allegedly kidnapped and murdered by a drug gang that was working with local police. The identification was announced on the Facebook page of the teaching school attended by the students, Kahn says, as well as by multiple media outlets.

An Ohio State University student who went missing Wednesday was found dead Sunday, apparently from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, police say.

The Associated Press reports that Kosta Karageorge, 22, was a senior defensive tackle on the OSU football team and a former Buckeyes wrestler.

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