exhumation

UPDATE: Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Over John Dillinger Exhumation

Dec 4, 2019
AP

NEW:

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A judge has dismissed a lawsuit a relative of 1930s gangster John Dillinger filed against an Indianapolis cemetery that opposes his plans to exhume Dillinger’s gravesite to determine if the notorious criminal is actually buried there.

Marion County Superior Court Judge Timothy Oakes granted Crown Hill Cemetery's motion to dismiss Michael Thompson's lawsuit shortly after Wednesday's hearing, saying state law requires the cemetery's consent.

Thompson, who’s Dillinger’s nephew, sued the cemetery after it objected to his plans to exhume the grave. Thompson says he has evidence Dillinger's body may not be buried there, and may not have been the man FBI agents fatally shot outside a Chicago theater in 1934,

ORIGINAL POST:

A judge will hear an Indianapolis cemetery's bid to dismiss a lawsuit filed by a relative of 1930s gangster John Dillinger who wants to exhume Dillinger's gravesite to determine if the notorious criminal is actually buried there.

Darron Cummings/AP Photo

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana officials have approved a new permit relatives of 1930s gangster John Dillinger had sought to exhume his Indianapolis gravesite.

The permit approved Thursday by the Indiana State Department of Health calls for the remains to be exhumed on Dec. 31.

Dillinger's nephew, Michael C. Thompson, applied for the permit last month after he and another relative obtained an earlier permit calling for a Sept. 16 exhumation.

NEW: Dillinger Family Members Apply Again To Exhume Body

Sep 11, 2019
BETH J. HARPAZ/AP PHOTO

NEW:

UPDATE: Indiana Cemetery Objects To John Dillinger Exhumation Plans

Jul 30, 2019
Beth J. Harpaz/AP Photo

 

UPDATE:

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Indianapolis cemetery where 1930s gangster John Dillinger is buried is objecting to his body's planned exhumation as part of a television documentary.

The Indianapolis Star reports Crown Hill Cemetery said in a statement Wednesday that it objects to the exhumation in part because it's concerned "the complex and commercial nature of this exhumation could cause disruption to the peaceful tranquility of the Cemetery" and people visiting loved ones' graves.

Dillinger was fatally shot by FBI agents in Chicago in 1934.

WXIN-TV reports that Dillinger's nephew, Michael C. Thompson, sued the cemetery Wednesday, arguing it should allow him and his family to exhume Dillinger's remains for a forensic examination to determine if it's in fact Dillinger's body.

That exhumation would be part of a Dillinger documentary for The History Channel.

PREVIOUS POST:

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Relatives of 1930s gangster John Dillinger want his body exhumed from an Indianapolis cemetery because they question whether he was actually the man FBI agents killed in Chicago in 1934.

The Indiana State Department of Health released affidavits signed by Mike Thompson and Carol Thompson Griffith, who say Dillinger was their uncle. They want the body exhumed for a forensic analysis.

The Chicago Sun-Times and WLS-TV in Chicago first reported on the affidavits supporting an exhumation permit.

The relatives say they've received "evidence" that the person who was killed at the Biograph Theater in Chicago on July 22, 1934, may not have been Dillinger.

The permit was approved in July. A&E Networks says the exhumation will be covered as part of a documentary for The History Channel.

A spokesman for A&E Networks says a documentary it's developing on gangster John Dillinger that's expected to include scenes of the planned exhumation of Dillinger's Indianapolis gravesite hasn't gone into production yet.

A&E Networks spokesman Dan Silberman said Thursday the documentary for The History Channel is still early in development and it's hard to say what the film's focus would be.

Silberman says he only learned this week about affidavits two of Dillinger's relatives filed in support of that permit saying that they believe Dillinger might not be buried in the grave.

Silberman says no date has been scheduled for the exhumation and additional approvals are still needed from government entities.