Debbie Elliott

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Pastors and other faith leaders from around the country gathered in front of the Glynn County, Ga., courthouse Thursday, where the trial of the three white men accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery is ongoing. The rally is the largest demonstration in Brunswick since the trial started a month ago.

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The state of Georgia has been building its murder case against three white men: Greg McMichael, Travis McMichael and William "Roddie" Bryan, for the killing of Ahmaud Arbery, a Black man, on Feb. 23, 2020.

The McMichaels and Bryan face charges of murder, aggravated assault and false imprisonment for chasing Arbery down a residential street in their trucks and shooting him three times with a shotgun.

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BRUNSWICK, Ga. — Opening statements will come this week in the murder trial of three white men accused in the killing Ahmaud Arbery, the 25-year-old Black man shot to death last year while jogging down a residential street.

It has taken more than two weeks to seat a jury for the racially-charged case, in part because so many prospective jurors say they have a firm opinion about what happened on February 23, 2020 in the Satilla Shores subdivision just outside Brunswick.

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BRUNSWICK, Ga. — The trial of three white men accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery has put Brunswick back in the national spotlight. Arbery was the 25-year old Black man shot to death last year while jogging through a neighborhood.

Artist Marvin Weeks memorialized Arbery in a mural that has become a focal point for racial justice advocates in this town on the Georgia coast.

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What does the law make of a chase that is shown on video, followed by the death of a man? Jury selection has begun in the trial of three men accused of killing Ahmaud Arbery. People are waiting outside the courthouse in Glynn County, Ga.

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We begin this hour in Brunswick, Ga., where the men accused of killing Ahmaud Arbery are standing trial. Arbery, a Black man, was killed in February of 2020 while he was jogging on a residential street.

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One of the killings that sparked racial justice protests last year is back in the national spotlight with a trial set to begin Monday in Brunswick, Ga. Three white men are accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year old Black man who was shot and killed as he was jogging down a residential street on Feb. 23, 2020, after being chased by pickup trucks.

"It was right here," says Theawanza Brooks, Arbery's aunt. "This is where he last laid to rest."

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The Senate is moving ahead with one of President Biden's top economic priorities.

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It took weeks of discussion, debate and negotiations, but the Senate today is set to finally sign off on a $1 trillion infrastructure bill.

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A monumental U.N. report released just this morning says climate change is accelerating, and we are running out of time to stop it.

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Big Time Diner in Mobile, Ala., stopped serving on July 23.

"We had 12 people test positive, so we shut down," says Robert Momberger, owner of the neighborhood restaurant, which specializes in Southern sides and fresh Gulf seafood. He was among the staff who got sick, and he didn't want it to spread further.

"Oh, yeah, and unfortunately, I got through COVID, but during the process of COVID, I got pneumonia," he says. "That's what I'm trying to get over now."

Updated July 28, 2021 at 10:52 AM ET

Just 34% of Alabamians are fully vaccinated – ranking last in the United States. And the state is experiencing a fourth wave of COVID infection that is spiking across the South, a region with low vaccination rates, and rapid spread of the more contagious delta variant of the virus.

In Alabama, hospitalizations are up five-fold since the beginning of July and public health officials are sounding the alarm.

A populist firebrand of Louisiana politics has died. Four-term Democratic Gov. Edwin Edwards, who also served prison time for corruption, died Monday at his home in Gonzales, La. He was 93. A statement from his family said he'd been in hospice care for the past week with respiratory problems.

Edwards was the last of the larger-than-life populists who once dominated Louisiana politics. He built his career on political patronage, public works and sheer force of personality.

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As some states pass laws to restrict voting, Black voting rights activists are fighting back with tactics reminiscent of the civil rights movement. Here's NPR's Debbie Elliott.

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