Frank Langfitt

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Updated November 12, 2021 at 1:59 PM ET

GLASGOW, Scotland — You might think the fossil fuel industry would steer clear of the United Nations climate summit. After all, fossil fuels have driven the crisis that COP26 is struggling to address.

But big energy is a big presence. Fossil fuel interests understand that international agreements to cut emissions pose an existential threat to them, and they come to the summits to monitor and sway the discussions.

GLASGOW, Scotland — The U.N. climate summit in Glasgow is scheduled to wrap up on Friday.

Negotiators have released a draft agreement that calls on countries to speed up cuts in carbon emissions. Wealthy countries have historically contributed the most greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

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GLASGOW, Scotland — Prime Minister Boris Johnson opened this week's climate summit in Glasgow by warning world leaders to take the necessary measures to prevent global temperatures from rising more than 1.5 degrees Celsius, or face catastrophic damage from climate change.

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Updated October 26, 2021 at 9:06 AM ET

SUTTON, England — Hundreds of people, mostly from Hong Kong, turned out for a welcome party last month at a public park in this leafy London suburb. Children, newly arrived from the former British colony, squealed as they slid down a giant inflatable slide, stood in long lines to have their faces painted and joined together to sing "It's a Small World After All" for their beaming parents.

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Updated October 12, 2021 at 4:15 PM ET

LONDON — There's a scene in the new James Bond film, No Time to Die, in which 007 takes a young woman back to his bungalow in Jamaica, thinking that — as in the past — he will effortlessly seduce her. Instead, she removes her wig, and Bond, who's been retired from MI6 for five years, realizes she's a British agent.

SURREY, ENGLAND — The British government is putting up to 150 army drivers on standby to operate gas tanker trucks, as the country's fuel delivery crisis continues and motorists roam greater London in search of open gas stations.

The government insists the U.K. is not facing a fuel shortage, just a shortage of drivers who can deliver it to the pump.

British Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said there were tentative signs that the volume of fuel in gas station storage tanks was stabilizing.

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LONDON — British Prime Minister Boris Johnson will meet with President Biden in Washington on Tuesday afternoon to discuss climate change and international security, among other topics.

On the climate front, Johnson is pressuring wealthy countries, including the United States, to spend more to help developing nations tackle climate change. Rich nations had pledged to spend $100 billion a year on the effort, but have fallen short. Speaking to reporters Monday, Johnson said he hoped Biden would commit to more.

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"Ted Lasso" is a TV show about an American football coach who takes over a mediocre English soccer club.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "TED LASSO")

LONDON — Government-sanctioned memorials to the victims of COVID-19 may be years away, but in Europe, some people are making their own. One of the most striking memorials so far is in London, where volunteers have painted more than 150,000 red hearts on a wall along the south bank of the River Thames.

People stop to write the names of lost loved ones inside the hearts along with messages as a way to remember and make sense of huge loss of life in the United Kingdom.

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To Northern Ireland now, it's come a long way since the troubles, the civil conflict that cost more than 3,600 lives. But tension, uncertainty - they remain just below the surface.

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As more people get vaccinated, they are beginning to think about travel again. But where to go? This summer, NPR's international reporters explore captivating places that provide insights into the nations they cover. This is the first part of a series.

LONDON — One of the things I love most about living in England is pubs. There is nothing like sitting by a warm fire on a damp winter evening, drinking English ale with friends, or lounging on a wooden deck along the River Thames on a hot summer day, watching boats and kayaks pass by.

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Britain's prime minister, Boris Johnson, is ready to lift almost all COVID-19 restrictions in England in about two weeks. He says it's time to get back to near normal, at least, and time to let people make their own decisions.

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And I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Geneva, where Joe Biden just wrapped up his first international trip as president. It ended here today with a four-hour meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

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CARBIS BAY, England — Security is tight in the English county of Cornwall as President Biden and other leaders of the Group of Seven – seven of the world's wealthiest countries — prepare to meet for a weekend summit beginning Friday.

But if you want to catch a firsthand glimpse of Biden, Germany's Angela Merkel or the other powerful politicians, your best bet may be a two-story sculpture that replicates their likenesses using electronic waste in the hills overlooking the resort where they are meeting.

LONDON — For the first time in nearly two years, the leaders of seven of the world's wealthiest democracies will meet to try to tackle some of the biggest global problems, including the post-pandemic recovery, climate change and the challenge of China. The three-day meeting of the Group of Seven, hosted by the United Kingdom, will open on Friday in Carbis Bay, a seaside resort in Cornwall in southwest England.

Updated June 10, 2021 at 1:01 PM ET

In their first face-to-face meeting, President Biden and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson signed a 21st century version of the historic Atlantic Charter, an attempt to depict their countries as the chief global leaders taking on the world's biggest challenges.

The two leaders pledged to work "closely with all partners who share our democratic values" and to counter "the efforts of those who seek to undermine our alliances and institutions."

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