Pallavi Gogoi

As head of NPR's business desk, Pallavi Gogoi leads the network's coverage of the most essential financial, economic, technology and media stories of the day.

Gogoi's mission is to bring a deeper understanding of the policies and actions of business and government and their impact on the everyday lives of people, the economy and the world.

Under her leadership, NPR's business reporters have cast a spotlight on current events shaping the country and society – from the intense scrutiny on Silicon Valley and the fight for and against free speech, the messaging from the White House and what that means for democracy, the #Metoo movement and its effect on working Americans, and the emotional and financial toll on families at the center of the opioid crisis.

Her interest in examining the tectonic shifts taking place in the American workforce led her to spearhead a poll asking basic questions about people's working life. The results were startling – they showed that while jobs are plentiful, they are increasingly unstable for many Americans who receive fewer benefits, work with less permanency, and earn uneven pay from month to month. A week-long NPR series examined the rise of the contract workforce in America.

She led her team to survey and understand the online shopping habits of the nation, the immense influence exerted by Amazon on the decisions we make when we buy, including when we search for what we buy.

Her focus has been on exclusivity, originality, and high impact powerful storytelling.

Before joining NPR in 2017, Gogoi was a Senior Editor at CNN Money, where she oversaw a team covering business news, markets, and the economy. Prior to that, she was a National Business Correspondent at the Associated Press, where her work on mortgage robo-signing was the subject of a Senate hearing. At USA Today, she covered the financial crisis and bank bailouts. At Business Week, she wrote high impact stories that led to changes at Walmart, Edelman, and The Washington Post.

Gogoi grew up in Shillong, a small town nestled in the mountains of Northeast India. She graduated from Delhi University, with a master's degree in English Literature from Hindu College, and a bachelor's degree from SGTB Khalsa College. She is fluent in five languages.

Humiliation. In China, it is a word laden with history and identity that is playing a role in the high-stakes trade war between the U.S. and China.

This month, I was visiting China with a small group of journalists for 10 days, and the word "humiliation" came up over and over again in conversations both public and private, in meetings with top government officials, university scholars, think tankers and corporate executives.

A top Huawei executive said Tuesday that the company is willing to sign a "no-spy agreement" with the United States to reassure U.S. leaders who say the company's technology could be used for surveillance.

The offer is similar to proposals the Chinese tech giant has made to the United Kingdom and Germany, and it comes after weeks of intense pressure from the Trump administration.

These are prosperous times in America. The country is plump with jobs. Out of every 100 people who want to work, more than 96 of them have jobs. This is what economists consider full employment.

The economy has grown for almost 10 years, making it one of the longest economic expansions in U.S. history. And over that time, the job market has come back. It grew slowly at first, then steadily, finally reaching a point at which there are many more openings than job seekers.

China's Vice President Wang Qishan likes parables.

He offers tales from ancient China when he wants to make a point.

I discovered that last week at the World Economic Forum at Davos, Switzerland, where Wang spoke and I listened intently on the translation headsets provided by the forum.

A new president is elected. Within days of being sworn in, he pulls his country out of a U.N. migration pact. His path to power has been pockmarked by disparaging comments about women, including a congresswoman. His preferred choice for top posts are members of the armed forces.

Davos is where world leaders preen and articulate grand visions in a glamorous setting that beckons with powdery snow and shiny klieg lights. The annual meeting, high in the Swiss Alps, is the ultimate gathering of the global elite.