Steve Carmody

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?

My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.

 

How did you get involved in radio?

I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  

 

What is your favorite way to spend your free time?

I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)

 

What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?

Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.

 

What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?

Zilch. I don’t listen to music.

 

What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?

This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.

 

What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?

I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.

 

What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?

The ability to cook.

 

What do you like best about working in public radio?

I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.

 

If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?

No one really.

 

Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?

The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.

 

What would your perfect meal consist of?

A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.

 

What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?

The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.

 

What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?

That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).

 

What else would you like people to know about you?

I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Copyright 2020 Michigan Radio. To see more, visit Michigan Radio.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Dozens of water activists attended a conference in Flint Wednesday.

The conference examined the ongoing effects of lead, PFAS and other contaminants turning up in public drinking water supplies.

Detroit Metro Airport is opening its terminals to some people without boarding passes.

As security has grown tighter at the nation’s airports, people dropping off or picking up passengers flying in or out have been stuck on the other side of the TSA security checkpoint.

A debate Thursday night between the two candidates for Flint mayor saw few sparks, but some sniping.

The University of Michigan Board of Regents heard from students enrolled at the Flint and Dearborn campuses, who complain they are not being treated as equals to Ann Arbor students. 

The regents met in Flint Thursday.

Tyrice Denson is a recent U of M-Flint graduate. He says, from instructor pay and scholarships to health services, the Flint and Dearborn campuses don’t get the financial support the Ann Arbor campus does.

“When our city needed a champion, he fought to get answers and justice.”

That’s how Flint Mayor Karen Weaver describes Maryland Congressman Elijah Cummings

Cummings died early Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital due to complications from longstanding health challenges.  He was 68.

If it wasn’t for the yard signs sprinkled around town, you might not know that Flint is electing a mayor next month.   

It’s been a low-key campaign between incumbent Karen Weaver and state representative Sheldon Neeley (D-Flint).   

Lansing’s Catholic bishop has responded to an internal review into complaints the diocese’s schools were racially insensitive.

The diocese was criticized after several African-American Lansing Catholic High School football players were benched after kneeling during the national anthem in 2017.

A former Catholic priest has pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor after a Detroit-area jury said it was having trouble reaching a unanimous verdict in his sexual abuse trial.

The Michigan Attorney General's office says Patrick Casey pleaded guilty Tuesday to aggravated assault. He was accused of engaging in sex acts with a younger man who was struggling with his Catholic faith and homosexuality and had sought Casey's counsel in 2013.

The maximum penalty is a year in jail.  

A lab error is being blamed for a positive test for chemical contamination with a chemical in the PFAS family in the River Raisin watershed.

A new Michigan State University study finds a decade of computer hacking has exposed the personal data of nearly 170 million hospital patients.

Researchers from MSU and Johns Hopkins University examined more than 1,400 hospital data breaches between 2009 and 2019. 

In Flint, city officials, law enforcement and church leaders are concerned about a rise in violent crime.

There have been 34 murders in Flint this year. That’s up from 30 this time last year.

Police Chief Tim Johnson says suspects in a triple homicide over the weekend are in custody.

Preparations are expected to begin this week for a quarter billion dollar mixed-use development on the border of Lansing and East Lansing.

Lansing Mayor Andy Schor says workers will be begin clearing the 36 acre site of the $270 million Red Cedar Development Project. A ground breaking is expected next month.

The number of cases of suspected respiratory illnesses connected to vaping continues to climb in Michigan.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services says there are now a dozen confirmed or probable cases of severe lung disease associated with vaping. The department is investigating another 14 possible cases.

Michiganders have mixed reactions to the Trump administration rolling back a key Obama-era environmental regulation.

The administration says revoking an Obama-era rule on waters and wetlands would provide "much-needed regulatory certainty" for farmers, homebuilders, and landowners.

Criminal charges have been dismissed against a small town police chief.

Thetford Township Police Chief Robert Kenny had been facing embezzlement and obstruction of justice charges.

The charges were filed in 2018 after allegations arose that he cashed more than $5,000 in checks related to the sale of federal government surplus property he acquired for his police department.

Marijuana businesses in Michigan hope to see progress on a federal bill that would give them the same access to banks as other businesses.  

Construction crews will be busy in Flint this fall trying to finish replacing thousands of lead pipes.

Abortion rights advocates are questioning the intent of a bill that would allow expectant parents in Michigan to claim a child tax deduction.

State Senator Tom Barrett’s (R-Potterville) bill would change the state’s tax code to allow a 12-week-old fetus to be eligible to be declared a dependent on state income tax forms.

He says Senate Bill 393 recognizes the expenses expectant parents rack up before their child is born.

Legislation regulating free speech policies on Michigan’s university and college campuses moved forward this week.

House Bill 4436 directs college and university administrators to develop free expression policies that allow students and faculty to discuss anything. It would also require that campuses be open to any speaker invited by students or faculty members.

The legislation is in response to past events where liberal student groups disrupted speeches by far-right speakers.

State health officials are launching an investigation into vaping.  They are looking for a possible link to a serious respiratory illnesses.

The Caro High School band played the school’s fight song as supporters of their hometown’s century-old psychiatric center rallied on the state capitol steps.

Residents of the small community in the Thumb rallied at the state Capitol on Tuesday. They urged state leaders to reconsider a plan to scale back a planned psychiatric facility in their town.

The Caro Center was in line to get a new 200-bed facility. But earlier this year, the Whitmer administration stopped construction of the $115 million facility.   

Marijuana products in Michigan may soon carry a warning label.

Legislation approved by the state House Judiciary Committee Tuesday would slap labels on marijuana products warning against use by women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. 

“When you are pregnant, marijuana use is not…the best thing you can be doing. And I believe everyone agrees with that,” says Rep. Graham Filler (R-DeWitt), the chairman of the Judiciary Committee.

Michigan State University attorneys are asking a federal judge to dismiss dozens of lawsuits filed by people who say they're victims of sexual abuse by Larry Nassar.

The lawsuits represent the second wave of plaintiffs filing suit against the university. 

The lawsuits were filed after MSU reached a $500 million settlement with more than 300 victims of Larry Nassar in June 2018.

U.S. Senators Debbie Stabenow and Gary Peters are pushing an expansion of a program designed to protect the Great Lakes.

The current Great Lakes Restoration Initiative is set to expire in 2021.

Michigan’s senior U.S. senator is concerned about what President Trump will do at this weekend’s G7 Summit.

The Group of Seven, or G7, includes the United States, Germany, Japan, Britain, France, Canada and Italy. 

President Donald Trump and other leaders of the world's most industrialized nations will open their annual G7 summit in France by discussing the global economy.

Economists say global economic growth has slowed, amid fears that a recession may be on the horizon. But President Trump insists the U.S. economy is strong.

Flint Junior High was closed Wednesday because of high temperatures inside the school.

Other Flint public school students are getting some relief from the heat.

A new report finds PFAS contamination in about one in ten public water systems in Michigan.

PFAS compounds (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) have been linked to serious health problems.  The chemicals were used in a variety of products, from firefighting foam to food packaging.

The Michigan Department of Education is getting an “incomplete” on its assignment to assign a letter grade to every Michigan school.

The state Department of Education will miss a September first deadline to provide "A to F" grades on Michigan schools.

The law requiring the new accountability system was passed during last year’s lame duck legislative session. But education department officials have struggled to compile all of the necessary data to meet the legislative timetable.

Michigan is joining nearly two dozen other states and several cities suing the Trump Administration over its decision to relax rules on fossil fuels fueled power plants emissions.

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