Steve Carmody

Steve Carmody has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

Q&A

What person, alive or dead, would you like to have lunch with? Why?

My wife. She’s the best company I’ve ever had, or expect to, over lunch.

 

How did you get involved in radio?

I started listening to all news radio when I was about 8 years old. In my teens, when other kids were listening to rock stations, I was flipping between KYW and WCAU in Philadelphia. I was fascinated listening to the news developing and changing through the day. When the time came to decide on what I wanted to study at college, I was drawn to broadcasting and journalism. I spent most of my four years in college at the campus radio station, including two years as news director.  

 

What is your favorite way to spend your free time?

I read (usually two books at a time, one book at work, another at home) and I go to see a lot of movies (about 50 or more a year)

 

What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter/host/etc.?

Covering the federal building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995 was a remarkable experience. It was going to be a quiet day newswise. Not much happening. I was at the state capitol to cover a rally. The earth shattering explosion changed that. I spent the next ten hours wandering around downtown, filing reports to my home station and NPR. For the next six weeks, it was literally the only story my station covered.

 

What one song do you think best summarizes your taste in music?

Zilch. I don’t listen to music.

 

What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?

This American Life. It’s the best story telling on radio.

 

What's a hidden talent you have that most people don’t know about?

I have no talent. Anyone who knows me well would agree.

 

What is one ability or talent you really wish you possessed?

The ability to cook.

 

What do you like best about working in public radio?

I like having the time to tell a story. I’ve grown tired over time working in commercial radio of trying to tell a complex story in 25 seconds or less. You can tell some stories in less than 25 seconds. But often, a truly interesting story needs a minute, 3 minutes or more to explain.

 

If you could interview any contemporary newsmaker, who would it be?

No one really.

 

Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?

The Amazing Race. As a fan and a former contestant, I just enjoy the thrill of seeing different parts of the world.

 

What would your perfect meal consist of?

A light appetizer. A good fish course. A well done steak. A pleasant dessert. A fine 20 year tawny port.

 

What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?

The computer. It has changed my personal and professional life.

 

What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?

That I not only watch Reality TV, but that I’ve been a Reality TV star (retired).

 

What else would you like people to know about you?

I enjoy living in Jackson, MI. So many Michigan cities and towns are struggling these days. Jackson’s no different. But, the people there are forging ahead. Jackson is also committed to being a community. 

Gov. Rick Snyder is moving into his final week on the job, but he’s still got a lot left to do.

Last week, the legislature sent the governor the last of more than 400 bills and resolutions passed during their lame duck session after the November election.

The Legislature’s lame duck session ends Thursday.   And maybe not a moment too soon for many state lawmakers struggling to make it to the final gavel.

The hectic pace and late hours appear to be catching up with state lawmakers.

Michigan’s jobless rate is hanging below 4 percent.

Michigan’s November unemployment rate remained unchanged from the previous month at 3.9 percent.  The nation’s jobless rate was also flat last month.

The state Legislature is in its final week of the lame duck session before the holiday break, and the bills are not slowing down.

Bills covering everything from shielding donor identities in campaigns to legislation on cleanup of toxic sites advanced in the Legislature Tuesday.

A controversial bill setting new standards for cleaning up contamination is on its way to the governor.

The state House approved the legislation Tuesday by a narrow 56 to 53 vote margin. The bill has already passed the state Senate.

The governor’s desk is the next stop for a bill to protect the identities of non-profit donors, including to political advocacy groups.

It would be a misdemeanor for a public official to require non-profits to disclose their donor list for government review under the legislation the state House approved today. 

State Senator Mike Shirkey (R-Clarklake) defends his bill against charges it’s intended to shield big name political donors trying to influence Michigan politics.

The city of Flint has reached a deal with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality on an agreement concerning oversight of the city’s water system.

The voluntary agreement announced Monday comes after months of disagreement over the MDEQ’s insistence on greater oversight of Flint’s water system.

The dispute dates back to August 2017, when the MDEQ informed the city of more than a dozen problems with Flint’s water system.

Once again, Christians and Satanists are mounting dueling holiday displays at the state capitol.

This morning, State Sen. Rick Jones (R-Grand Ledge) erected a small nativity scene on the lawn of the capitol building.  He’s been doing this since 2014, when a Satanist group announced plans to erect their own “Snaketivity” on the capitol grounds.

Michiganders will likely not notice much if there is a federal government shutdown at the end of this week.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer says it's up to President Donald Trump whether the federal government partially shuts down at midnight Friday over his border wall.

Trump has said he'd be "proud" to have a shutdown over the $5 billion he wants for the wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

Asked Sunday if there was room for compromise, Schumer told NBC: "He's not going to get the wall in any form."

Time is running out for Michiganders to sign up for health care coverage through the Affordable Care Act.   

Midnight Saturday is the deadline to qualify for next year’s health plans. 

Lapeer County’s sheriff is apologizing for comments one of his employees made against the Flint police department.

A video surfaced online earlier this month showing a Lapeer County Sheriff’s employee implying that Flint police officers don’t care about murder, drug sales, or prostitution that occurs in the city.

Flint’s mayor is dumbfounded by a decision to offer a new state job to one of the defendants in the Flint water crisis criminal investigation.

The U.S. Olympic Committee has fired chief of sport performance Alan Ashley in the wake of an independent report that said neither he nor former CEO Scott Blackmun elevated concerns about the Larry Nassar sexual abuse allegations when they were first reported to them.

Today, a judge decided another top state health department official should face trial in connection with the Flint water crisis.

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