Green

For many in Anchorage, Alaska, winter and its accompanying outdoor opportunities are something to relish rather than escape.

But as Alaska's fast-warming climate starts to disrupt typical seasonal patterns, residents of the state's largest city are being forced to renegotiate their relationship with winters that now seem defined by ice as much as snow.

Sure, everybody thinks it's great when a story is read by many hundreds of thousands of folks. That's definitely a success.

But what about stories that don't get a lot of pageviews? Maybe the headline just didn't catch a reader's eye. Or maybe there was so much news that day that the story slipped through the cracks of the internet and tumbled into digital oblivion.

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Christmas is over. And by now, if you've got a real tree, it's probably dropping needles and about ready to move out of your living room. One eco-friendly recommendation for tree disposal is to throw it on your compost pile to decompose.

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In early March, people who live along Mozambique's long coastline began to hear rumors about a cyclone.

The storm was forming in the Indian Ocean, in the narrow band of warm water between Mozambique and the island of Madagascar. Overnight on March 14, 2019, the storm struck Mozambique head-on, barreling over the port city of Beira and flooding an enormous swath of land as it moved inland toward Zimbabwe.

On the night that the House of Representatives voted to impeach President Trump, he delivered a two-hour campaign rally speech that took a detour — into the bathroom. His long riff about plumbing, household appliances and lightbulbs had the crowd in Battle Creek, Mich., cheering and laughing along.

"I say, 'Why do I always look so orange?' You know why: because of the new light," Trump said in a complaint about energy-efficient lightbulbs. "They're terrible. You look terrible. They cost you many, many times more. Like four or five times more."

Jane Fonda’s name is back in the headlines, but not for any of her work in Hollywood.

The actor and activist has been arrested numerous times in recent months as she protests each Friday against inaction on climate change

Too Much Ice In Anchorage

Dec 26, 2019

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Alaska is warming twice as fast as the global average. This year is expected to be the warmest on record in Anchorage. As Nat Herz of Alaska's Energy Desk reports, this is changing residents' winter way of life.

Meet The Weavers (Rebroadcast)

Dec 25, 2019

Across the country, people are working hard to end loneliness, isolation and to support those not given a fair shake at school or on Main Street. There are remarkable Americans who say they’re repairing some of the tears in society. They belong to a group called “Weavers,” who are trying to put trust, empathy, connectedness and community well-being at the center of American life.

On the first day of cutting at Joey Clawson's Christmas tree farm, in the mountains outside Boone, N.C., four workers picked their way through Fraser firs planted in neat rows. It took just a few seconds to chainsaw each tree, which Clawson had spent years pampering.

He has about 95,000 trees in the ground, of various sizes and ages. For nearly a decade before harvest, workers fertilize individual trees by hand, shape them one by one with giant machetes, and, if needed, help them fight pests.

Michigan motorists were taken aback on Friday by an alarming image lurking just off the highway: a mysterious green liquid oozing from the walls of Interstate 696, spilling onto the road's shoulder.

"It certainly is an impressive sight," said Jill Greenberg, spokeswoman with the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy.

Soon after, state and federal environmental officials descended on the interstate just north of Detroit, and it did not take long to trace the green liquid's source.

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Now we'd like to take a moment to remember some of the biggest storms of the last 10 years.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS MONTAGE)

GWEN IFILL: Hurricane Sandy began battering its way ashore today. The huge system had 50 million people in its sights.

A large portion of Australia is on fire after weeks of extreme heat, strong winds and drought that have created ideal conditions for hundreds of bushfires to thrive across the country. Several fires have been burning since November, particularly in the eastern state of New South Wales.

It’s a familiar feeling this time of year. The last-minute gift panic. Whether it’s the work gift swap you forgot about or an unexpected gift from an acquaintance… in times like these, it seems more and more people are turning toward the online retail giant Amazon for their holiday needs.

With its promise of fast and so-called free shipping, and its giant selection, it can be a godsend for the consumer.

But what’s behind those low prices and quick delivery?

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