Green

Angel Portillo doesn't think about climate change much. It's not that he doesn't care. He just has other things to worry about. Climate change seems so far away, so big.

Lately though, Portillo says he has been thinking about it more often.

Standing on the banks of a swollen and surging Arkansas River, just upriver from a cluster of flooded businesses and homes, it's easy to see why.

"Stuff like this," he says, nodding at the frothy brown waters, "all of the tornadoes that have been happening — it just doesn't seem like a coincidence, you know?"

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Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Climate Crisis.

About Sean Davis's TED Talk

In 1988, the Montreal Protocol was the first step in a long process to save the ozone layer. Sean Davis explains the impact of the agreement, and the lessons we can apply to the crisis we face today.

About Sean Davis

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Climate Crisis.

About Jennifer Wilcox's TED Talk

To slow climate change, we need to lower emissions and remove carbon from the atmosphere. Chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox says the technology is there, and we need to scale it.

About Jennifer Wilcox

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Climate Crisis.

About Bruce Friedrich

Bruce Friedrich shows how plant and cell-based products could soon transform the way we eat ... and reduce the global meat industry's impact on the planet.

About Bruce Friedrich's TED Talk

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Climate Crisis.

About Greta Thunberg's TED Talk

In 2018, teenager Greta Thunberg began protesting to demand action on climate change. She has inspired protests worldwide. Greta says it's time to panic: we're running out of time to save our planet.

About Greta Thunberg

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Climate Crisis.

About Per Epsen's TED Talk

Psychologist Per Espen Stoknes explains the inner defenses that block most people from recognizing the urgency of climate change. He asks, what is a better way to think and talk about this crisis?

About Per Epsen

Drew and Joan Norman have been producing organic vegetables on 60 acres just north of Baltimore since 1983. On a recent spring day, signs of another new season at One Straw Farm were everywhere: seedlings in the greenhouse waiting to be transplanted, asparagus ready to be picked, tiny leaves of red- and green-leaf lettuce sprouting out of the ground — and rows and rows of plastic covering the ground on each field.

Updated at 9:13 p.m. ET

Seventeen of the world's largest automakers have asked the White House and the state of California to restart talks and come up with one set of greenhouse gas standards for cars.

The Trump administration has been pushing to roll back regulations, while California has been holding tight to its tougher rules for auto emissions. The carmakers, meanwhile, call for "common sense compromise."

National Weather Service meteorologists noticed something puzzling on their radar screens in Southern California on Tuesday evening — a big green blob.

"It was very strange because it was a relatively clear day and we weren't really expecting any rain or thunderstorms," Casey Oswant, a NWS meteorologist in San Diego, tells NPR. "But on our radar, we were seeing something that indicated there was something out there."

The largest habitat for life on Earth is the deep ocean. It's home to everything from jellyfish to giant bluefin tuna. But the deep ocean is being invaded by tiny pieces of plastic — plastic that people thought was mostly floating at the surface, and in amounts they never imagined.

Oregon is on track to become the second U.S. state to pass an economywide cap-and-trade system to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. But while emulating the first such program (in California), Oregon also hopes to avoid repeating its mistakes.

Oregon's plan, like California's, would set a cap on greenhouse gas emissions that would come down over time. It would also create a market for companies to buy and trade a limited number of pollution permits. Ultimately, it aims to reduce emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by 2050.

At least 11 climbers died on Mount Everest last month, including two Americans in pursuit of joining the Seven Summits Club, a select group of roughly 500 people worldwide who have climbed the tallest peaks on every continent. Everest was the final summit for both Christopher Kulish and Donald Cash. Each died on his descent.

The chief of the U.S. Forest Service is warning that a billion acres of land across America are at risk of catastrophic wildfires like last fall's deadly Camp Fire that destroyed most of Paradise, Calif.

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