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Leaded gasoline's century-long reign of destruction is over.

The final holdout, Algeria, used up the last of its stockpile of leaded gasoline in July. That's according to the U.N. Environment Programme, which has spent 19 years trying to eliminate leaded gasoline around the globe.

"The successful enforcement of the ban on leaded petrol is a huge milestone for global health and our environment," Inger Andersen, UNEP's executive director, said Monday.

More than a million people are without power across Louisiana and Mississippi after Ida barreled on land as a Category 4 hurricane, bringing storm surge and high winds and killing at least one person. Ida has since been downgraded to a tropical storm and continues north.

If you're in an area affected by the storm, here are some resources that can help you stay safe and informed:

Updated August 30, 2021 at 4:02 AM ET

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Hurricane Ida knocked out power to all of New Orleans and inundated coastal Louisiana communities on a deadly path through the Gulf Coast that was still unfolding and promised more destruction.

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Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere that contribute to climate change are the highest ever recorded — and that's going back 800,000 years.

Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported that the concentration of carbon dioxide, one of the primary greenhouse gases, hit 412.5 parts per million in 2020. That's 2.5 parts per million higher than in 2019, and it's now the highest ever observed, the scientists said.

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Heavy rainfall and catastrophic flooding events like those that hit Western Europe last month will be more frequent and intense due to climate change, a new scientific study says.

Life-threatening storm surges, heavy rainfall and hurricane-force winds are expected to hit Louisiana's coastline Sunday or early Monday, the National Hurricane Center warned.

Tropical Storm Ida was barreling toward the Gulf Coast and was forecast on Thursday to hit Louisiana as a Category 2 hurricane this weekend. The National Hurricane Center also issued a tropical storm watch for the Mississippi-Alabama border to the Alabama-Florida border.

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Heads up: There's an unwelcome visitor in Pennsylvania and officials are urging residents to take caution.

The spotted lanternfly has been moving in and threatening agriculture and trees, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.

The flies are known to cause some serious damage to trees, including oozing sap, wilting and leaf curling. In more serious cases, they can cause trees, vines, crops and many other types of plants to die.

MONROE TOWNSHIP, N.J. — Residents across the waterlogged Northeast began clearing mud and tearing out sodden carpets Monday after deluges dropped by Tropical Storm Henri, whose remnants threatened further flooding in New England as the system made a slow trek back to the sea.

The smell of sewage filled the air as residents of Rossmoor, a retirement community in central New Jersey's Monroe Township, returned to soaked homes and ruined possessions after Henri turned their streets into rivers.

Some areas in Tennessee saw almost a quarter of their average annual rainfall in only a few hours over the weekend— and the rain brought devastating flash flooding too. At least 21 people are dead and dozens are still missing as residents continue to assess the damage.

By the heat of the afternoon, smoke from the largest wildfire burning in the U.S., the Dixie Fire, drifts into Paradise, Calif.

"Quite literally, it's hanging over your head," says Dan Efseaff, director of the Paradise Recreation and District.

Climate change is driving longer and more intense wildfire seasons, and when fires get big enough they can create their own extreme weather. That weather includes big funnels of smoke and flame called "fire tornadoes." But the connection between the West's increasingly severe fires and those tornadoes remains hazy.

In late June, firefighters on the Tennant Fire in Northern California captured footage that went viral.

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Updated August 22, 2021 at 6:24 PM ET

WAVERLY, Tenn. — At least 22 people were killed and rescue crews searched desperately Sunday amid shattered homes and tangled debris for dozens of people still missing after record-breaking rain sent floodwaters surging through Middle Tennessee.

Updated August 21, 2021 at 9:48 PM ET

WAVERLY, Tenn. — Catastrophic flooding in Middle Tennessee left at least eight dead and dozens missing Saturday as rains washed away homes and rural roads, authorities said.

Humphreys County Sheriff Chris Davis told news outlets more than 30 people have been reported missing.

Updated August 20, 2021 at 2:53 PM ET

The National Hurricane Center has issued a rare hurricane watch for parts of New England, warning that Tropical Storm Henri will likely develop into a hurricane before making landfall on the northeastern U.S. coast this weekend.

"If Henri strikes southeast New England as a hurricane this weekend, it will be the first direct hurricane landfall since Bob in 1991," National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration spokesman Chris Vaccaro told NPR.

Greenland saw rain at the highest point of its ice sheet for the first time since scientists have been making observations there, the latest signal of how climate change is affecting every part of the planet.

According to the U.S. National Snow & Ice Data Center, rain fell for several hours on an area 10,551 feet in elevation on Aug. 14, an unprecedented occurrence for a location that rarely sees temperatures above freezing.

When news of the 7.2 magnitude earthquake that struck Haiti over the weekend reached Marleine Bastien, she asked herself two questions.

"I was numb. I was angry, asking, 'Why Haiti can't get a break? How are we to cope with so many disasters piling on each other?' " she recalled.

A pesticide that's been linked to neurological damage in children, including reduced IQ, loss of working memory, and attention deficit disorders, has been banned by the Biden administration following a years-long legal battle.

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The extent of the devastation in Haiti grows worse by the day.

The death toll following the 7.2-magnitude earthquake that struck the southwestern part of the island on Saturday has climbed to 1,941 and nearly 10,000 people were injured, according to official counts on Tuesday.

Haiti's Civil Protection Agency anticipates those figures will climb, noting that many people are still missing.

Outdoor workers in the United States could face four times as many days with hazardous heat by mid-century if action isn't taken to reduce greenhouse gas pollution, according to a report published Tuesday by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS).

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