Green

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As the temperature in Grand Island, Neb., soared to 91 degrees that July day in 2018, two dozen farmworkers tunneled for nine hours into a thicket of cornstalks, snapping off tassels while they crossed a sunbaked field that spanned 206 acres — the equivalent of 156 football fields.

It happened again.

Over the weekend, Haiti was hit by a magnitude 7.2 earthquake that crumbled homes and buildings and killed more than 1,200 people.

Rescuers are still working to find survivors amid the rubble. The death count is expected to rise.

More than a decade ago, a similar quake left an estimated 220,000 dead, more than 1 million people displaced and roughly 300,000 injured.

As the world's top climate scientists released a report full of warnings this week, they kept insisting that the world still has a chance to avoid the worst effects of climate change.

There was nothing cool about it.

July was the hottest month ever recorded in human history, according to new data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

"In this case, first place is the worst place to be," NOAA Administrator Rick Spinrad said in a statement. "July is typically the world's warmest month of the year, but July 2021 outdid itself as the hottest July and month ever recorded."

Excessive heat warnings are up across the Pacific Northwest as communities brace for the second major heat wave of the summer in the region.

As OPB reports, triple-digit temperatures are unusual in cities like Portland, Ore., which has opened several emergency cooling centers.

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Elon Musk has gotten a lot of things wrong. He's blown deadlines, pissed off regulators, driven away talented employees, and made unfulfilled promises that ran the gamut from unrealistic to absurd.

Updated August 12, 2021 at 12:43 PM ET

Some 195 million Americans — out of a population of more than 330 million — are facing dangerously high temperatures, as much of the mainland U.S. is under excessive heat advisories beginning Thursday and expected to last until the weekend.

Call it fate or an unfortunate coincidence that Dr. Seuss' The Lorax celebrates its 50th anniversary the same week the United Nations releases an urgent report on the dire consequences of human-induced climate change. The conflict between the industrious, polluting Once-ler and the feisty Lorax, who "speaks for the trees," feels more prescient than ever.

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Smoke from wildfires raging in Russia has reached the North Pole for the first time in recorded history.

More than 200 climate scientists just released a stark look at how fast the climate is warming, showing heat waves, extreme rain and intense droughts are on the rise. The evidence for warming is "unequivocal" but the extent of future disasters will be determined by how fast governments can cut heat-trapping emissions. Here are the top findings from the report.

There's a forgotten history that should serve as a warning — wildfire isn't unique to the West.

Now the warming climate is increasing the risk of major wildfires across America. And more people are moving to fire-prone areas without realizing the danger.

Explore the project.

Facing record-breaking dry conditions across the West, the U.S. Forest Service announced it will aggressively put out wildfires this summer. As a result, the agency's use of "good fire," the lower-intensity blazes that clear out overgrown forests, will also stop.

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Natural disasters have names and labels. Hurricane names are selected from a predetermined list. Diseases, at one point often named for where they originated, now follow a specific set of naming guidelines. Wildfires get names too.

A pretty little white flower that grows near urban centers of the Pacific Northwest turns out to be a killer.

The bog-dwelling western false asphodel, Triantha occidentalis, was first described in the scientific literature in 1879. But until now, no one realized this sweet-looking plant used its sticky stem to catch and digest insects, according to researchers who note in their study published Monday it's the first new carnivorous plant to be discovered in about 20 years.

The United Nations just released its landmark climate report, urging countries to urgently cut their greenhouse gas emissions or else face catastrophic consequences.

So what exactly should the Biden administration do?

The massive Dixie Fire in Northern California has now been burning for nearly a month — it ignited in the Sierra Nevada around four weeks ago on July 13.

Thousands of people are under evacuation orders as the fire has blossomed to consume nearly 500,000 acres. It is currently 21% contained and has destroyed at least 400 structures.

The fire poses a dire threat to small communities, having ravaged the town of Greenville last week. It currently threatens nearly 14,000 more structures.

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A monumental U.N. report released just this morning says climate change is accelerating, and we are running out of time to stop it.

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Global climate change is accelerating and human-caused emissions of greenhouse gases are the overwhelming cause, according to a landmark report released Monday by the United Nations. There is still time to avoid catastrophic warming this century, but only if countries around the world stop burning fossil fuels as quickly as possible, the authors warn.

The message to world leaders is more dire, and more unequivocal, than ever before.

The Dixie Fire in Northern California, which has destroyed hundreds of buildings and whole communities, is now considered the second largest recorded wildfire in state history.

The fire, spanning Butte, Plumas, Lassen, & Tehama counties, has so far burned more than 463,000 acres and is 21% contained, according to CalFire.

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