Purdue

Tyler Trent's Cells Lead To Groundbreaking Therapy

3 hours ago
Christine Drury/Indiana University

Researchers at Indiana University have found a new therapy that significantly slows tumor growth in some cells. It was developed from cells donated by Tyler Trent, a Purdue University student with bone cancer who died last year.

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

One company aims to offer an affordable solution to extend the life of wine and prevent millions of partially consumed wine bottles get poured down the drain each year.

With support from Purdue University’s Research Foundation, ArT Wine Preservation has developed a canister containing argon gas that when sprayed into the opened wine bottle, pushes out the oxygen extending the bottle’s life.

Sakeeb Sabakka/Flickr

When Indiana’s college students return to class next semester, they’ll start to see more in-state jobs marketed to them. A program called “Let Indiana Work For You” aims to convert college graduates into highly-skilled workers.

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (AP) — Purdue University officials have approved plans for new buildings on the West Lafayette campus that will house the school’s bands and data science programs.

Plans for the $20 million Bands and Orchestra Building will give dedicated space to Purdue’s more than 30 ensembles, concert bands and jazz bands.

Construction will be paid for with private donations.

The new $40 million Data Science Building will be four stories with classrooms and research space.

Reaction From Purdue NAACP To Daniels' Apology

Dec 5, 2019

Purdue University President Mitch Daniels is retracting and apologizing for a comment in which he called an African American scholar, in his words,  “one of the rare creatures in America.”

Eric Weddle/WFYI News

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (AP) — Purdue University President Mitch Daniels is apologizing for recent remarks in which he described an African-American scholar as “one of the rarest creatures in America."

Daniels sent a letter Wednesday to black groups and others in which he said, “Ï retract and apologize for a figure of speech I used in a recent impromptu dialogue with students.”

Purdue To Study Safety Of Electric Skateboards, Scooters

Dec 3, 2019

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (AP) — Purdue University plans to study the safety of electric skateboards and scooters in response to a rash of serious injuries on campus.

AT&T, Purdue University Partner For 5G Research Lab

Nov 27, 2019
Provided by AT&T

Purdue University College of Engineering and AT&T are building a new lab that will expand research into 5G technologies. The collaboration will provide a test bed for entrepreneurs and researchers.

Indianapolis is already a pilot city for telecommunication companies to test 5G wireless networks, but some are hoping to take it a step further.

Your Backyard Could Help Migrating Birds Survive

Nov 26, 2019
Seth Tackett/WTIU

Purdue University researchers say migratory bird populations are going down because of climate change and habitat loss — but urban and suburban Hoosiers can help. 

Jessica Outcalt is a PhD candidate through Purdue’s Department of Forestry and Natural Resources. She says parks and backyards in Indiana’s urban and suburban areas can provide migratory birds with food and shelter from predators.

Outcalt says Hoosiers who want to help can plant native trees, shrubs, and grasses in their yards — but even smaller actions can make a difference.

STAN JASTRZEBSKI / WBAA NEWS

U.S. Surgeon General – and former Indiana Health Commissioner – Jerome Adams says additional screenings could offer Indiana college students more information about their potential for drug overdose and addiction.

Speaking Monday at Purdue University, Adams talked about what he called his own family’s genetic predisposition to addiction, and suggested that first-year students could benefit from taking an exam which correlates adverse childhood experiences with a likelihood for addiction later in life.

Rebecca Wilcox/Purdue

Researchers from Indiana have found a possible way to better deliver cancer drugs to tumors in the brain. The challenge in delivery lies in what’s called the blood-brain barrier.

The blood-brain barrier protects the brain from dangerous foreign substances but also blocks drugs including chemotherapy from reaching tumors that have spread to the brain.

Purdue University scientists have provided the first comprehensive look at the blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers.

Samantha Horton/IPB News

The U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded Purdue University researchers about $1 million to develop growing techniques for organic hemp production.

Legal, commercial growth of hemp is set to start next year with farmers eager to get into the market.

Purdue University agronomy department head Ron Turco says the research will help create a base-level understanding of growing hemp.

Tom Campbell/Purdue Agricultural Communication

In Indiana, we grow a lot of corn for gasoline, but plants like switchgrass and sorghum can be used for fuel too — and producing those fuels creates fewer greenhouse gas emissions.

But those plants can also be harder to break down. Researchers at Purdue University say they’ve found easier ways of doing it. 

The thing that makes woody plants woody is also what makes them hard to turn into fuel — a compound called lignin.

https://www.facebook.com/purduesigtau/photos/a.631321426883789/631323040216961/?type=3&theater

Authorities say a college student from New Jersey faces rape charges in the assault of a woman at a fraternity party off Purdue University's campus.

NJ.com reports Friday that 18-year-old Richard Chan, of Jackson, was charged in the attack that police say he recorded on his cellphone.

The (Lafayette) Journal & Courier reports police say a drunken Chan followed the woman into a bathroom at a Sigma Tau Gamma party Oct. 19 and raped her.

The woman reported the assault. Chan was jailed but posted bond the following day.

HAMMOND, Ind. (AP) — A Purdue University professor and his wife have pleaded guilty to using more that $1 million in federal research funds for their own personal expenses.

Sixty-one-year-old Qingyou Han of West Lafayette is director of Purdue's Center for Materials Processing Research. He and his wife, 53-year-old Lu Shao of Lakewood, Ohio, pleaded guilty Friday to a felony wire fraud charge in federal court in Hammond.

Pages