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Employers can get career, technical education student information in new tool

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Justin Hicks/IPB News
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The Indiana Governor’s Workforce Cabinet is sharing student contact information, on a voluntary basis, with companies looking to hire. The Career and Technical Education (CTE) Employer Connector tool launched at the start of the school year.

When students sign up for CTE classes across the state, they can opt in or out of the information sharing. For students who opt in, companies will be able to request that data, based on the types of classes students are taking.

PJ McGrew, executive director of the workforce cabinet, said students could get jobs while still in school or be better positioned for job offers upon graduation. Meanwhile, employers struggling to find workers can have a new tool to fill their ranks.

“You know, as we are dealing with this labor force issue, there could be a talent pipeline in our backyard that we’re not really leveraging to the best of our ability,” he said.

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McGrew notes there’s still a few kinks in the database, but around six companies have already shown interest in the data.

Contact reporter Justin at jhicks@wvpe.org or follow him on Twitter at @Hicks_JustinM.

Justin Hicks has joined the reporting team for Indiana Public Broadcasting News (IPB News) through funding made available by (IPBS) Indiana Public Broadcasting Stations. Justin will be based out of WVPE in his new role as a Workforce Development Reporter for IPB News. Justin comes to Indiana by way of New York. He has a Master's Degree from the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University. He previously earned a Bachelor of Music Degree from Appalachian State University where he played trumpet. He first learned about Elkhart, Indiana, because of the stamp on his brass instrument indicating where it was produced.