Allison Aubrey

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Even amid the coronavirus pandemic, heart disease continues to be the nation's leading cause of death. And much of it is preventable through a healthier diet.

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The FDA says at least one popular e-cigarette brand can stay on the market. It's the first authorization of its kind. This comes as the FDA is still deciding whether Juul and other e-cigarette products should be sold.

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The "diet" in diet drinks may be a false promise for some soda lovers. True, they deliver the fizz and taste of a soda experience, without the calories. Yet, new research shows they also can leave people with increased food cravings.

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Updated September 8, 2021 at 2:33 PM ET

On the morning of September 11, 2001, Elizabeth Cascio, an emergency medical technician with the New York City Fire Department, was in Queens directing a first responder training program, when the team got a call to mobilize to the World Trade Center. Her team arrived in a caravan of buses and ambulances just as the second tower collapsed.

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With the U.S. in the grips of a frightening surge of coronavirus cases, many parents are understandably eager to know when the COVID-19 vaccine will finally be available for children under 12.

This age group accounts for about 50 million Americans and currently none of them qualify for a shot. But scientists are racing to figure out how one of the COVID-19 vaccines currently available for adults could be given to this age group.

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People with compromised immune systems who already got two doses of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines can now get a third shot to boost their protection from COVID-19.

This week's decision by federal health agencies is welcome news to many patients and their doctors who have been calling for this for months.

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Updated July 27, 2021 at 3:09 PM ET

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revised its guidance on wearing masks Tuesday. In a reversal of its earlier position, the agency is now recommending that some fully vaccinated people wear masks indoors if they live in areas with significant or high spread.

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