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Indiana News

Study: To Keep Energy Prices Competitive, State Shouldn't Favor Certain Sources

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(Rebecca Thiele/IPB News)
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Energy prices in states surrounding Indiana are expected to go up — which could make Indiana more attractive to businesses. That’s according to a new study released by the Indiana Chamber of Commerce. It comes just a few weeks after a legislative task force finalized its recommendations for a statewide energy plan. 

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Greg Ellis is the Indiana Chamber’s vice president of energy, environment, and federal affairs. He says because Indiana utilities invested in more infrastructure, the state's electricity prices have gone up faster than surrounding states — but those prices are expected to plateau.

“Those surrounding states didn't make those investments. So over the next few years, we shouldn't have to invest as much," Ellis said.

To keep Indiana competitive, the study said Indiana shouldn’t favor any particular energy source — especially when it’s no longer the cheapest option.

“Not just keep something open because it is a good policy for wind, solar, coal, gas — whatever it is," Ellis said.

The study also suggests the state look into financing to get rid of debt on coal plants that retire early, examine how sources like rooftop solar should factor into rates, and not rush into any policy decisions.

CLARIFICATION: The original version of this story stated that Jesse Kharbanda worried the report would portray renewable energy as less reliable than other sources. To be more clear, he is actually worried that a higher percentage of renewable energy sources would be seen as less reliable.

Contact Rebecca at rthiele@iu.edu or follow her on Twitter at @beckythiele.

Indiana Environmental reporting is supported by the Environmental Resilience Institute, an Indiana University Grand Challenge project developing Indiana-specific projections and informed responses to problems of environmental change.