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Regenstrief study could offer solutions to combat health care worker burnout

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Justin Hicks / IPB News
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As many Indiana hospitals are overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients, health care workers say they’re simply burned out. But a recent study from the Regenstrief Institute may have some ideas to help employers reduce workplace fatigue.

Researchers interviewed 40 mental health clinicians working on reducing burnout in their respective health care systems. The researchers found that emphasizing person-centered care over productivity, avoiding bureaucracy, and prioritizing employee professional development helped workers deal with burnout. 

READ MORE: Health experts preach COVID-19 precautions ahead of end-of-year winter holidays

Angela Rollins is an investigator at Regenstrief’s Center for Health Services Research. She said busy health care systems might not have time to institute all the best practices, but administrators can do small things now to help overloaded care units.

“We’re in the middle of a hospital surge right now, so having some sort of presence on those units and to show solidarity, I think that goes a long way.”

Rollins said for everyone else, the best way to help health care workers avoid burnout right now is simple: just get vaccinated.

Contact reporter Justin at jhicks@wvpe.org or follow him on Twitter at @Hicks_JustinM.

Justin Hicks has joined the reporting team for Indiana Public Broadcasting News (IPB News) through funding made available by (IPBS) Indiana Public Broadcasting Stations. Justin will be based out of WVPE in his new role as a Workforce Development Reporter for IPB News. Justin comes to Indiana by way of New York. He has a Master's Degree from the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University. He previously earned a Bachelor of Music Degree from Appalachian State University where he played trumpet. He first learned about Elkhart, Indiana, because of the stamp on his brass instrument indicating where it was produced.